Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-9z9qw Total loading time: 0.257 Render date: 2021-07-29T04:52:20.177Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Effect of long-chain fatty alcohols from orujo olive oil on nitric oxide and eicosanoid generation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2008

M. A. Fernández Arche
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Seville, C/ Profesor García Gonzalez No. 2
R. de la Puerta Vázquez
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Seville, C/ Profesor García Gonzalez No. 2
A. Márquez Martín
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Seville, C/ Profesor García Gonzalez No. 2
V. Ruiz-Gutierrez
Affiliation:
Instituto de la Grasa (CSIC), Av. Padre García Tejero No. 4, 41012 Seville, Spain
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
1st International Immunonutrition Workshop, Valencia, 3–5 October 2007, Valencia, Spain
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2008

Olive pomace oil (‘orujo’ oil) is an olive oil product suitable for human consumption that is traditionally produced in Spain(Reference Perona, Aracemis, Ruiz-Gutierrez and Catalá1). The non-acylglycerol component of this oil is a good source of interesting minor components, e.g. triterpenes(Reference Perez Camino and Cert2), or fatty alcohols, derived from waxy materials. Tetracosanol (C24OH; 30%), hexacosanol (C26OH; 37%) and octacosanol (C28OH; 15%) are the major constituents of the long-chain fatty alcohol (LCFA) fraction isolated from orujo olive oil(Reference Marquez3). A similar mixture of long-chain alcohols, termed ‘policosanol’ and purified from waxy materials of different sources such as sugar cane, bees wax, rice bran or spinach, have shown many beneficial physiological activities(Reference Taylor, Rapport and Lockwood4, Reference Singh, Li and Porter5). The present study focused on the effect of LCFA isolated from orujo olive oil on NO, PGE2 and TNFα release by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophage cell line (RAW-264.7) as well as the effect on thromboxane B2 (TXB2) generation by A-23187-stimulated rat peritoneal neutrophils (PMN). Nitrite (as an index of NO generation) levels were determined by a fluorometric method. PGE2, TNFα and TXB2 production were quantified by sandwich immunoassay.

LCFA significantly and dose-dependently decreased the NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW-264.7 cell line macrophages (Fig. 1). Western-blot analysis for inducible NO synthase (iNOS) showed that NO reduction was a consequence of the 100% inhibition of iNOS expression at a dose of 100 μg/ml (Fig. 2). By contrast, LCFA scarcely affected PGE2 levels (Fig. 1). TNFα production was also significantly decreased by LCFA at the highest dose assayed (100 μg/ml; Fig. 1). LCFA significantly reduced TXA2 production in rat PMN stimulated with A-23187 (Fig. 3).

Fig. 1. Effect of LCFA on NO, PGE2 and TNFα produced by LPS (10 μg/ml)-stimulated RAW-264.7 murine macrophages (1×106 cells/ml). Mean values were significantly different from those for LPS control group: **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.

Fig. 2. Effect of LCFA subfraction on iNOS expression and densitometric analysis in RAW 264.7 cells. DEX, dexamethasone; OD, optical density.

Fig. 3. Effect of LCFA on TXB2 produced by A-23187-stimulated rat PMN. Mean values were significantly different from the control value: *P<0.05, ***P<0.001.

These results showed that LCFA isolated from ‘orujo’ oil has a protective effect on some mediators implicated in the development of inflammatory damage in these experimental models and suggest its potential value as a functional component of the olive pomace oil.

This study is part of the project AGL2005–00572/ALI, financially supported by the Comision Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CICYT).

References

1. Perona, JS, Aracemis, C, Ruiz-Gutierrez, V & Catalá, A (2005) J Agric Food Chem 53, 730735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Perez Camino, MC & Cert, A (1999) J Agric Food Chem 47, 15581562.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Marquez, A (2007) Doctoral Thesis, Universidad de Sevilla.Google Scholar
4. Taylor, JC, Rapport, L & Lockwood, GB (2003) Nutrition 19, 192195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Singh, DK, Li, L & Porter, TD (2006) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 318, 10201026.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Effect of long-chain fatty alcohols from orujo olive oil on nitric oxide and eicosanoid generation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Effect of long-chain fatty alcohols from orujo olive oil on nitric oxide and eicosanoid generation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Effect of long-chain fatty alcohols from orujo olive oil on nitric oxide and eicosanoid generation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *