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Effect of dietary oils on oxidative stress and cytokine production by murine macrophages

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2008

R. de la Puerta Vázquez
Affiliation:
Dpto Farmacología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Seville, Spain
M. A. Fernández Arche
Affiliation:
Dpto Farmacología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Seville, Spain
A. Márquez Martín
Affiliation:
Grupo de Nutrición y Metabolismo Lipídico, Instituto de la Grasa, (CSIC), Seville, Spain
V. Ruiz-Gutierrez
Affiliation:
Grupo de Nutrición y Metabolismo Lipídico, Instituto de la Grasa, (CSIC), Seville, Spain
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Abstract

Type
1st International Immunonutrition Workshop, Valencia, 3–5 October 2007, Valencia, Spain
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2008

Many studies have shown that the nature of the lipid consumed in the diet significantly affects the prevalence of coronary, inflammatory or autoimmune diseases(Reference James, Gibson and Cleland1, Reference Yaqoob2). The present study was conducted to compare the impact of feeding mice on diets enriched with edible oils (150 g/kg diet; fish oil (FO), olive oil (OVO) and orujo olive oil (ORO)) with that of a basal diet (BD) enriched with 20 g maize oil/kg on the ability to modulate oxidative reactive species and pro-inflammatory mediator generation by stimulated murine macrophages. Swiss male mice were fed on the different diets for 8 weeks. Diets were formulated according to American Institute of Nutrition (AIN) recommendations(Reference Bieri, Stoewsand, Briggs, Philips, Woodward and Knapka3). Peritoneal macrophages were isolated from these mice and stimulated. Reactive oxygen (O2– and H2O2) and nitrogen (NO2–) species, PGE2, TNFα and IL-6 were measured in the supernatant fractions from 106 cells. All test diets down regulated NO generation compared with the BD (Fig.1); in contrast, FO increased H2O2 generation whereas OVO and ORO group diets significantly inhibited this ROS production compared with the BD. In addition, ORO was able to decrease O2– formation compared with the BD group (Fig.1). Finally, both OVO and FO groups significantly decreased PGE2 and cytokine production (Fig. 2). These results are in agreement with those of other authors in that a diet enriched in olive oil was found to show a protective effect against oxidative stress and inflammation(Reference Moreno, Carbonell, Sanchez, Miret and Mitjavila4, Reference Perona, Arcemis, Ruiz-Gutierrez and Catala5)and they confirm the preventive anti-inflammatory properties of FO(Reference Calder6). Moreover, the results provide important additional data about the ability of ORO to prevent oxidative damage to cells.

Fig. 1. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice fed on different oil-enriched diets. Values are means with their standard errors represented by vertical bars for five animals fed on each diet. Mean values were significantly different from those for BD (ANOVA and Student's t test): *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.

Fig. 2. PGE2 and cytokines generated by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice fed on different oil-enriched diets. Values are means with their standard errors represented by vertical bars for five animals fed on each diet. Mean values were significantly different from those for BD (ANOVA and Student's t test): *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.

This study is part of the project AGL2005–00572/AlI, financially supported by the Comision Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CICYT).

References

1. James, MJ, Gibson, RA & Cleland, LG (2000) Am J Clin Nutr 71, 343348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Yaqoob, P (2003) Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 6, 133150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Bieri, JG, Stoewsand, GS, Briggs, GM, Philips, RW, Woodward, JC & Knapka, JJ (1977) J Nutr 107, 13401348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Moreno, JJ, Carbonell, T, Sanchez, T, Miret, S & Mitjavila, MT (2001) J Nutr 31, 21452149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Perona, JS, Arcemis, C, Ruiz-Gutierrez, V & Catala, A (2005) J Agric Food Chem 53, 730735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Calder, PC (2006) Am J Clin Nutr 86, 15051519.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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