Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-mgm4h Total loading time: 0.162 Render date: 2021-06-19T01:49:02.494Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Dietary diversity in eight Latin American countries: Results from ELANS Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2020

Georgina Gomez
Affiliation:
University of Cost Rica, San Jose, Costa Rica
Regina Mara Fisberg
Affiliation:
University of Costa Rica, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Agatha Nogueria Previdelli
Affiliation:
Universidade Sao Judas Tadeu, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Irina Kovalskys
Affiliation:
International Life Science Institute, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Mauro Fisberg
Affiliation:
Instituto Pensi, Sao Paulo, Brazil Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Marianella Herrera-Cuenca
Affiliation:
Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of.
Lilia Yadira Cortes Sanabria
Affiliation:
Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Colombia
Martha Cecilia Yepez
Affiliation:
Universidad de San Francisco de Quito, Quito, Ecuador
Rossina G. Pareja
Affiliation:
Instituto de Investigación Nutriciona, Lima, Peru
Attilio Rigotti
Affiliation:
Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Santiago, Chile
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Dietary diversity, define as the number of food items or food groups consumed over a given period of time measured at the household or individual level, is widely recognized as a key dimension of diet quality. This analysis investigated dietary diversity in eight Latin-American countries and its associations with sociodemographic and anthropometric parameters.

Data from the ELANS study conducted in eight Latin-American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela) were analyzed. The ELANS study interviewed 9,218 subjects living in the main cities in each country. Food intake were collected using two 24-hour dietary recalls, following the Multiple Pass Method. For calculation of diet diversity score, only the first 24-hour recall was analyzed. Dietary diversity was assessed at individual level. All food items reported to be consumed during the first 24-hour recall were classified into nine food groups: 1. Cereals, 2. White roots and tubers, 3. Vegetables, 4. Fruits, 5. Meat, poultry and offal, 6. Fish and seafood, 7. Eggs, 8. Pulses, legumes and nuts and 9. Milk and milk products. The selection of these groups was based on the Women's Dietary Diversity Score Projectfood groups classification. Consumption of at least 15 g of each food group was assigned 1 point or 0 points if consumption was less than 15 g. Thus, the score ranged from a minimum of 0 and a maximum of 9 points. Higher scores indicated higher diversity as more food groups were eaten. Analysis was performed by age group, gender, and socioeconomic level (SES) as well as anthropometric measurements.Mean diet diversity score (DDS) for the whole sample was 4.48 ± 1.16, ranging from 0 to 9 points. Men showed significant higher DDS. No difference was observed among age groups. Among countries, Ecuador and Peru showed the highest DDS, 4.88 ± 1.22 and 4.82 ± 1.12 points, respectively; while Argentina (4.20 ± 1.13) and Venezuela (4.27 ± 1.04) reported the lowest. We found a statistically significant trend (p < 0.001) to a higher DDS among those subjects in the high socio-economic level. Regarding anthropometric measurements, no differences were found in DDS among different nutritional status or based on waist and neck circumference measures.This study revealed that dietary diversity is limited among Latin American countries regardless of sex, age, socioeconomic level, and nutritional status. Nutritional interventions emphasizing the importance of maximizing dietary diversity should be encouraged to ensure optimum nutritional adequacy within the region

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2020
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Dietary diversity in eight Latin American countries: Results from ELANS Study
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Dietary diversity in eight Latin American countries: Results from ELANS Study
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Dietary diversity in eight Latin American countries: Results from ELANS Study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *