Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-m9pkr Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-14T11:09:24.487Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Reference Materials for the Study of Polymorphism and Crystallinity in Cellulosics – ERRATUM

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2013

Rights & Permissions [Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Erratum
Copyright
Copyright © International Centre for Diffraction Data 2013 

In Fawcett et al.,Reference Fawcett, Crowder, Kabekkodu, Needham, Kaduk, Blanton, Petkov, Bucher and Shpanchenko1Figures 9–11 are incorrectly captioned. Correct captions are displayed below.

Figure 9. X-ray diffraction patterns of cellulose triacetate that were processed under varying degrees of mechanical and thermal processing. The processing treatments changed molecular orientation and crystallinity.

Figure 10. Four digital X-ray diffraction pattern simulations for four independent determinations of ammonia cellulose, each pattern is clearly distinguishable from the others.

Figure 11. Top: The maximum d-spacing distribution for cellulosic materials in the Release 2012 PDF-4+ database. Bottom: Characteristic examples from experimental data. The two with major peaks at low angles are substituted celluloses while the third pattern is unsubstituted.

The publisher regrets the error.

References

1.Fawcett, T.G., Crowder, C.E., Kabekkodu, S.N., Needham, F., Kaduk, J.A., Blanton, T.N., Petkov, V., Bucher, E., and Shpanchenko, R. (2013). “Reference Materials for the Study of Polymorphism and Crystallinity in Cellulosics,” Powder Diffraction 28(1), 1831.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Figure 0

Figure 9. X-ray diffraction patterns of cellulose triacetate that were processed under varying degrees of mechanical and thermal processing. The processing treatments changed molecular orientation and crystallinity.

Figure 1

Figure 10. Four digital X-ray diffraction pattern simulations for four independent determinations of ammonia cellulose, each pattern is clearly distinguishable from the others.

Figure 2

Figure 11. Top: The maximum d-spacing distribution for cellulosic materials in the Release 2012 PDF-4+ database. Bottom: Characteristic examples from experimental data. The two with major peaks at low angles are substituted celluloses while the third pattern is unsubstituted.