Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-xvx2z Total loading time: 0.436 Render date: 2021-08-02T03:57:55.553Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

The structure of parasite component communities in brackish water fishes of the northeastern Baltic Sea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2002

E. T. VALTONEN
Affiliation:
Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, 40100 Jyväskylä, Finland
K. PULKKINEN
Affiliation:
Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, 40100 Jyväskylä, Finland
R. POULIN
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, University of Otago, PO. Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand
M. JULKUNEN
Affiliation:
Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, 40100 Jyväskylä, Finland

Abstract

We used nestedness analysis to seek non-random patterns in the structure of component communities of metazoan parasites collected from 31 sympatric fish species from the northeastern Bothnian Bay, the most oligohaline area of the Baltic Sea. Only 8 marine parasite species were found among the 63 species recorded, although some marine fish species reproduce in the bay and others occasionally visit the area. Marine parasite species can utilize both freshwater and marine fish species as intermediate or final hosts, and marine fish can harbour freshwater parasite species. This exchange of parasite species between marine and freshwater fish has probably resulted from ecological factors acting over short time scales rather than from evolutionary processes acting over longer time; the key factor probably being the immediate presence of suitable intermediate and definitive hosts. Marine fish were expected to harbour species-poor parasite communities consisting mainly of generalists acquired from the sympatric freshwater fish species, which would result in a nested pattern among the different component communities. However, an anti-nested pattern was found in the component communities of metazoan parasites of fishes from the Bothnian Bay. A likely explanation for the observed pattern is that there are specialist parasite species, the majority of which are cestodes, in some of the freshwater fish species which otherwise have depauperate parasite communities.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2001 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
52
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The structure of parasite component communities in brackish water fishes of the northeastern Baltic Sea
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The structure of parasite component communities in brackish water fishes of the northeastern Baltic Sea
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The structure of parasite component communities in brackish water fishes of the northeastern Baltic Sea
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *