Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-5wlnc Total loading time: 0.141 Render date: 2021-07-28T21:43:53.958Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Phylogenetic relationships of three hymenolepidid species inferred from nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 December 1997

M. OKAMOTO
Affiliation:
Institute of Experimental Animal Sciences, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Osaka 565, Japan
T. AGATSUMA
Affiliation:
Department of Bioresource Chemistry, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro 080, Japan
T. KUROSAWA
Affiliation:
Institute of Experimental Animal Sciences, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Osaka 565, Japan
A. ITO
Affiliation:
Department of Parasitology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu 500, Japan

Abstract

Three hymenolepidid tapeworms, Hymenolepis diminuta, H. nana and H. microstoma, are commonly maintained in laboratory rodents and used in many experimental model systems of tapeworm infections. We examined partial sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships of the 3 hymenolepidid species. Parts of the CO1 gene and ITS2 were amplified by PCR and sequenced directly. The CO1 gene sequence obtained was the same in length (391 bp) among all specimens. In the case of ITS2, however, several insertions and deletions were detected (671–741 bp) not only among species but also between an American isolate and a Japanese isolate of H. diminuta. Percentage nucleotide differences between H. diminuta and H. microstoma, or H. diminuta and H. nana were 16·6–18·2% for the CO1 gene and 21·3–22·9% for ITS2. The differences in both sequences between H. microstoma and H. nana were about 14%. Phylogenetic trees inferred from both of the nucleotide sequences showed similar topology, and suggest that H. diminuta may have diverged from the common ancestral line the earliest, and that H. nana is closer to H. microstoma than to H. diminuta.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
1997 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
34
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Phylogenetic relationships of three hymenolepidid species inferred from nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Phylogenetic relationships of three hymenolepidid species inferred from nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Phylogenetic relationships of three hymenolepidid species inferred from nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *