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Genetic variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 within three species of Progamotaenia (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from macropodid marsupials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2004

M. HU
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia
R. B. GASSER
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia
N. B. CHILTON
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, 112 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5EZ, Canada
I. BEVERIDGE
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia

Abstract

Sequence variation within 3 morphologically defined species of the anoplocephalid cestode genus Progamotaenia (P. ewersi, P. macropodis and P. zschokkei) was investigated using the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene. The magnitude of genetic variation detected within each morphospecies suggests that, in each instance, several cryptic species are present. Within P. ewersi, 5 genetically distict groups of cestodes were detected, 1 shared by Macropus robustus and M. parryi in Queensland, 1 in M. agilis from Queensland, 1 in Petrogale assimilis from Queensland, 1 in Macropus fuliginosus from South Australia and 1 in Wallabia bicolor from Victoria. In P. macropodis, cestodes from M. robustus from Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory, M. parryi from Queensland and M. eugenii from South Australia were genetically distinct from those in Wallabia bicolor from Queensland and Victoria and from M. fuliginosus from South Australia. P. zschokkei consisted of a number of genetically distinct groups of cestodes, 1 in Lagorchestes conspicillatus and L. hirsutus from Queensland and the Northern Territory respectively, 1 in Petrogale herberti, P. assimilis and M. dorsalis from Queensland, 1 in Onychogalea fraenata from Queensland, 1 in M. agilis from Queensland and 1 in Thylogale stigmatica and T. thetis from Queensland. In general, genetic groups within each morphospecies were host specific and occurred predominantly in a particular macropodid host clade. Comparison of genetic relationships of cestodes with the phylogeny of their hosts revealed examples of colonization (P. zschokkei in M. agilis) and of host switching (P. zschokkei in M. dorsalis).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2004 Cambridge University Press

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Genetic variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 within three species of Progamotaenia (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from macropodid marsupials
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Genetic variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 within three species of Progamotaenia (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from macropodid marsupials
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Genetic variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 within three species of Progamotaenia (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from macropodid marsupials
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