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Using the Focused Ion Beam to Perform Serial Sectioning of Micron-Sized Particles for Coordinated Nanoscale Analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Nabil D. Bassim
Affiliation:
nabil.bassim@nrl.navy.mil, United State Naval Research Laboratory, Nanoscale Materials Section, Code 6366, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC, 20375, United States
Bradley T. De Gregorio
Affiliation:
brad.degregorio@nrl.navy.mil, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Nanoscale Materials Section, Washington, DC, 20375, United States
Rhonda M. Stroud
Affiliation:
rms@anvil.nrl.navy.mil, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Nanoscale Materials Section, Washington, DC, 20375, United States
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Abstract

Standard Focused Ion Beam (FIB) lift-out methods for production of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections destroy many cubic microns of material in order to produce a single 100-nm thick section. Microtome sectioning, in contrast, allows serial sectioning of adjacent multiple 100-nm sections, without loss of materials between sections, but lacks site specificity. In order to maximize the yield of analyzable material in thin section form from valuableone-of-a kind- micron-sized samples, we have developed serial sectioning techniques that combine FIB lift-out with microtomy. In this paper, we show an example of sectioning and subsequent TEM analysis of simulated cometary residues which resemble impact craters collected during the NASA Stardust Mission. These techniques may be generalized to any one-of-a-kind sample for which preserving analyzable volume is critical, such as forensic analysis of dust particles, failure analysis and electronic device sectioning.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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References

1. Giannuzzi, L.A., Kempshall, B.W., Schwarz, S.M., Lomness, J.K., Prenitzer, B.I. and Stevie, F.A., “FIB Lift-Out Specimen Preparation Techniques” Introduction to Focused Ion Beams, ed. Gianuzzi, L.A. and Stevie, F.A. (Springer, 2005), pp.201228 Google Scholar
2. Horz, F. et al., Science, 314, 1716 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Kearsley, A.T. et al, Meteoritics and Plantary Science, 41, 167 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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Using the Focused Ion Beam to Perform Serial Sectioning of Micron-Sized Particles for Coordinated Nanoscale Analysis
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