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Exploiting Automatic Image Processing and In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy to Understand the Stability of Supported Nanoparticles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 July 2022

James P. Horwath
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
Leena Vyas
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
Dmitri N. Zakharov
Affiliation:
Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA
Rémi Mégret
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, San Juan, PR, USA
Peter W. Voorhees
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA
Eric A. Stach*
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
*
*Corresponding author: stach@seas.upenn.edu
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Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Artificial Intelligence, Instrument Automation, And High-dimensional Data Analytics for Microscopy and Microanalysis
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2022

References

Horwath, J et al. , npj Comp. Mater. 6 (2020), p. 108. doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41524-020-00363-xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Horwath, J, Voorhees, P and Stach, EA, Nano Letters, 21 (2021) p. 5324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
J.P.H. and E.A.S. acknowledge support through the National Science Foundation, Division of Materials Research, Metals and Metallic Nanostructures Program under Grant 1809398. This research used resources of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, which is a U.S. DOE Office of Science Facility, at Brookhaven National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-SC00127044. P.W.V. acknowledges financial assistance under award 70NANB19H005 from U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of the Center for Hierarchical Materials Design. The authors would like to thank Kim Kisslinger at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory for assistance with data collection, and Katherine Elbert and Christopher Murray from the Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania for help with nanoparticle synthesis and self-assembly.Google Scholar
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