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On the unsteady motion of a rotating fluid in a cavity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2010

L. M. Hocking
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, University College, London.

Extract

The two examples of fluid motion in a container which are described in this paper can be easily demonstrated in any kitchen. The first motion was noticed by Professor C. A. Rogers while attempting to dissolve chlorine tablets in water to improve its drinkability. The water nearly filled a cylindrical jar and he had shaken it, with the axis of the jar horizontal, in such a way that the water had a considerable angular momentum about the axis. When the axis of the jar was suddenly moved into the vertical position, he noticed that the water was now rotating about the vertical, which prompted the question of the source of this vertical component of angular momentum. A simplified version of this motion is determined mathematically in §2, and the observations are found to be in general agreement with the theoretical prediction.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © University College London 1965

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References

1. Greenspan, H. P., J. Fluid Mech., 20 (1964), 673696.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Stewartson, K. and Roberts, P. H., J. Fluid Mech., 17 (1963), 120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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