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Depicting Properties’ Properties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2021

JOHN KULVICKI*
Affiliation:
DARTMOUTH COLLEGEJohn.v.kulvicki@dartmouth.edu

Abstract

Little has been said about whether pictures can depict properties of properties. This article argues that they do. As a result, resemblance theories of depiction must be changed to accommodate this phenomenon. In addition, diagrams and maps are standardly understood to represent properties of properties, so this article brings accounts of depiction closer to accounts of diagrams than they had been before. Finally, the article suggests that recent work on perceptual content gives us reason to believe we can perceive properties of properties.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © American Philosophical Association 2021

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Footnotes

I thank two anonymous reviewers for very helpful comments.

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