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The row houses at Oplontis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2020

Ivo van der Graaff
Affiliation:
University of New Hampshire ivo.vandergraaff@unh.edu
Regina Gee
Affiliation:
University of Montana, Bozeman rgee@montana.edu
Jennifer L. Muslin
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin jlmuslin@utexas.edu
John R. Clarke
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin j.clarke@austin@utexas.edu

Extract

In the spectrum of the cities buried by Vesuvius, studies of humble dwellings have suffered from poor preservation, a lack of documentation and a general disinterest. Small commercial spaces frequented by non-élites, such as tabernae, thermopolia, cauponae, popinae and cenacula, remain difficult to identify as they often doubled as domestic spaces and Latin terminology does not always match the architectural remains. A few studies have focused on the place of such spaces within Roman architecture as well as on the economic rôles of tabernae and/or rental accommodations.1 This paper expands on these approaches by offering the preliminary results of research at Oplontis B (Torre Annunziata) by the Oplontis Project, one of the few sites where a series of row houses sheds light on the domestic aspects of tabernae and their rôle in urban development along the Bay of Naples.2

Type
Articles
Copyright
© Journal of Roman Archaeology L.L.C. 2020

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