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A new hexactinellid sponge from the reef trail member of the Upper Guadalupian Bell Canyon Formation, Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2016

J. Keith Rigby
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, S-389 Eyring Science Center, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602-4604,
Gorden L. Bell
Affiliation:
Guadalupe Mountains National Park, HC 60, Box 400, Salt Flat, Texas 79847-9400,
Corresponding

Extract

Sponges from Permian beds in West Texas have been known from the early pioneer publication on the Guadalupian fauna by Girty (1908) and the later works by King (1933, 1943), Finks (1960, 1983, 1995), and Rigby et al. (1998). The sponge described here is perhaps the youngest hexactinellid known from the region. It was collected from the Reef Trail Member, the uppermost member of the Upper Guadalupian Bell Canyon Formation, from fault-isolated exposures of the formation in the Patterson Hills (Fig. 1) in the southwestern part of Guadalupe Mountains National Park, south of El Capitan and Guadalupe Peak.

Type
Paleontological Note
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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A new hexactinellid sponge from the reef trail member of the Upper Guadalupian Bell Canyon Formation, Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas
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