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Latest Cambrian cornutes (Echinodermata: Stylophora) from the Taebaeksan Basin, Korea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2016

Seung-Bae Lee
Affiliation:
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, <sblee77@snu.ac.kr>, <dkchoi@snu.ac.kr>
Bertrand Lefebvre
Affiliation:
UMR Biogéosciences, Université de Bourgogne, 6 boulevard Gabriel F-21000 Dijon, France, <bertrand.lefebvre@u-bourgogne.fr>
Duck K. Choi
Affiliation:
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea, <sblee77@snu.ac.kr>, <dkchoi@snu.ac.kr>

Abstract

The oldest echinoderms and first cornute stylophorans ever reported from Korea are described, based on more than 40 specimens collected from the Late Cambrian of the Taebaeksan Basin. New material doubles the number of stylophorans described from Asia and the number of specimens of Late Cambrian stylophorans recorded throughout the world. Three different cornutes are identified: Sokkaejaecystis serrata n. gen. and sp. and two genus and species indeterminate forms A and B. Sokkaejaecystis serrata and indeterminate form B are assigned to the Chauvelicystinae, while the systematic position of indeterminate form A within cornutes is difficult to assess. This new material suggests paleobiogeographic connections between echinoderm faunas from Korea, western North America (Wyoming), and western Europe (Montagne Noire, Shropshire). A cladistic analysis of selected cothurnocystids shows that Sokkaejaecystis n. gen. is closely related to Prochauvelicystis and the sister group of a clade uniting Ampelocarpus with Lyricocarpus. The analysis also confirms the placement of Milonicystis within the Chauvelicystinae and questions the monophyly of the genus Chauvelicystis.

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Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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