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Hoploparia albertaensis, a new species of clawed lobster (Nephropidae) from the late Coniacian, shallow-marine Bad Heart Formation of northwestern Alberta, Canada

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2016

Dale Tshudy
Affiliation:
Department of Geosciences, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro 16444, <dtshudy@edinboro.edu>
W. Steven Donaldson
Affiliation:
Consultant, EnCana Corporation, EnCana on 9th, 150-9th Avenue SW, Calgary, Alberta T2P 2S5, Canada, <Steve.Donaldson@encana.com>
Christopher Collom
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences, Mount Royal College, 4825 Richard Road SW, Calgary, Alberta T3E 4W8, Canada, <cjcollom@shaw.ca>
Rodney M. Feldmann
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242, <rfeldman@kent.edu>
Carrie E. Schweitzer
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Kent State University Stark Campus, Canton, Ohio 44720, <cschweit@kent.edu>

Abstract

A new species of clawed lobster, Hoploparia albertaensis, is reported from the late Coniacian, shallow-marine Bad Heart Formation of northwestern Alberta, Canada. Hoploparia is a well-known, clawed lobster genus with a record extending from Early Cretaceous (Valanginian) to Miocene. Fifty-one species of Hoploparia are known worldwide; 13 from the North American Western Interior Seaway. None of the 12 other Interior Seaway species, of any age, closely resembles the new species. The new species strongly resembles Hoploparia gabbi Pilsbry, 1901 from the upper Santonian–lower Campanian of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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Hoploparia albertaensis, a new species of clawed lobster (Nephropidae) from the late Coniacian, shallow-marine Bad Heart Formation of northwestern Alberta, Canada
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