Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-fkkrz Total loading time: 0.169 Render date: 2021-06-13T03:36:30.825Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Enigmatic fossil encrusting an Upper Ordovician rocky shore on Hudson Bay, Canada

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2015

Markes E. Johnson
Affiliation:
1Department of Geosciences, Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts 01267 <markes.e.johnson@williams.edu>
Mu Xi-Nan
Affiliation:
2Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Academia Sinica, Nanjing 210008, China <muxinan@public1.ptt.js.cn>, <rongjy@pub.jlonline.com>
Rong Jia-Yu
Affiliation:
2Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Academia Sinica, Nanjing 210008, China <muxinan@public1.ptt.js.cn>, <rongjy@pub.jlonline.com>

Abstract

Storeacolumnella hudsonensis is described as a new genus and species of encrusting, colonial organism that lived in an intertidal, rocky-shore environment. The fossil was discovered in the basal beds of the Upper Ordovician Port Nelson Formation at a coastal outcrop on Hudson Bay near Churchill, Manitoba. Showing some possible characteristics of sponges and other possible characteristics of calcaerous green algae, this matlike organism is considered nonetheless to have uncertain taxonomic affinities. It consists of cylinder-shaped columns, each with an internal system of star-shaped filaments or spicules as viewed in transverse section. The cylinders stand vertical in longitudinal section and are densely packed together to form a mat. The hard substrate to which the mat is attached consists of a boulder eroded from the Precambrian Churchill Quartzite. Maximum colony size observed in a single example exhibits a diameter of not less than 80 mm and maximum thickness of 5.85 mm.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bodeur, Y. 1995. Reefal buildups by Dasycladacean alga in the Tithonian of Languedoc (France). Publications Service Geologique de Luxembourg, Volume XXIX; p. 6772. 2nd European Regional Meeting, ISRS.Google Scholar
Dragasan, O., Ciotru, T., and Brustur, T. 1987. Neoteutloporella sociales (Praturlon), algae “ricifale” du domaine tethysien. Review of Paleobiology, 6:143149.Google Scholar
Edhorn, A.-ST. and Anderson, M. M. 1977. Algal remains in the Lower Cambrian Bonavista Formation, Conception Bay, southeastern Newfoundland, p. 113123. In Flügel, E. (ed.), Fossil Algae Recent Results and Developoments. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Elliott, G. F. 1985. Palaeosiphonium, a probplematic Jurassic alga. Bulletin of British Museum of Natural History (Geology), 38(5):283286.Google Scholar
Hillis, L. 1991. Recent calcified Halimediaceae, p. 167188. In Riding, R. (ed.), Calcareous Algae and Stromatolites. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, M. E. 1992. Studies on ancient rocky shores: A brief history and annotated bibliography. Journal of Coastal Research, 8:797812.Google Scholar
Johnson, M. E., and Baarli, B. G. 1987. Encrusting corals on a latest Ordovician to earliest Silurian rocky shore, southwest Hudson Bay, Manitoba, Canada. Geology, 15:1517.2.0.CO;2>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, M. E., and Libbey, L. K. 1997. Global review of Upper Pleistocene (Substage 5e) rocky shores: Tectonic segregation, substrate variation, and biological diversity. Journal of Coastal Research, 13:297307.Google Scholar
Johnson, M. E., Skinner, D. F., and MacLeod, K. G. 1988. Ecological zonation during the carbonate transgression of a Late Ordovician rocky shore (Northeastern Manitoba, Hudson Bay, Canada). Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 65:93114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kazmierczak, J. 1974. Lower Cretaceous sclerosponge from the Slovakian Tatra Mountains. Palaeontology, 17:341347.Google Scholar
Mergl, M. 1984. Marcusodictyon, an encrusting bryozoan from the Lower Ordovician (Tremadocian) of Bohemia. Vestník Ústredniho ústavu geologického, 59:171172.Google Scholar
Mu, Xi-Nan. 1982. Some calcareous algae from Xizang, p.205-240. In The Series of the Scientific Expedition to the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau: Palaeontology of Xizang. Volume 5. Science Press, Beijing. (In Chinese with English abstract)Google Scholar
Mu, Xi-Nan. 1991. Fossil Udoteaceae and Gymnocodiaceae, p. 146166. In Riding, R. (ed.), Calcareous Algae and Stromatolites. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
Roux, A. 1991. Ordovician to Devonian marine calcareous algae, p. 249–169. In Riding, R. (ed.), Calcareous Algae and Stromatolites. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
Skinner, D. F., and Johnson, M. E. 1987. Nautiloid debris oriented by long-shore currents along a late Ordovician-early Silurian rocky shore. Lethaia, 20:157164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taylor, P. D. 1984. Marcusodictyon Bassler from the Lower Ordovician of Estonia: not the earliest bryozoan but a phosphatic problematicum. Alcheringa, 8:177186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
van den Hoek, C. 1981. Chlorophyta: morphology and classification, p. 86132. In Lobban, C. S. and Wynne, M. J. (eds.), The Biology of Seaweeds. Botanical Monographs, Volume 17. Blackwell Scientific Publications.Google Scholar
Witzke, B. J. 1980. Middle and Upper Ordovician paleogeography of the region bordering the Transcontinental Arch, p. 118. In Fouch, T. D. and Magathan, E. R. (eds.), Paleozoic Paleogeography of the West Central United States, Paleogeography Symposium 1, Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists, Rocky Mountain Section, Denver, Colorado.Google Scholar
5
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Enigmatic fossil encrusting an Upper Ordovician rocky shore on Hudson Bay, Canada
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Enigmatic fossil encrusting an Upper Ordovician rocky shore on Hudson Bay, Canada
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Enigmatic fossil encrusting an Upper Ordovician rocky shore on Hudson Bay, Canada
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *