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Switchable window based on electrochromic polymers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Chunye Xu
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195
Lu Liu
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195
Susan E. Legenski
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195
Dai Ning
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195
Minoru Taya
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195
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Abstract

A large contrast ratio (>ΔΤ = 60%) and rapid switching (0.3–1 s) electrochromic (EC) polymer device that consists of a laminated two-layer structure between two electrodes was prepared. The new design consists of an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass electrode, a cathodic EC polymer film, a solid electrolyte, and a counterelectrode that replaces the anodic EC polymer and ITO electrode. Four EC polymers including two new EC polymers, Poly[3-methyl-3′-propyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-thieno(3,4-b)(1,4)dioxepine] (PProDOT-MePro) and Poly[3,3-diethyl-3,4-dihydro-2H,7H-(1,4)dioxepino(2,3-c)pyrrole] (PProDOP-Et2), were synthesized as cathodic EC polymers. A carbon-based counterelectrode was prepared for comparison with an Au-based counterelectrode. Several kinds of polymer gel electrolytes were prepared for comparison. The devices (windows) were increased in area from 0.028 × 0.04 in.2, 1 × 1 in.2 to 3 × 3 in.2 Three main components, the EC polymer film, the gel electrolyte, and the counterelectrode, were studied and their optical properties, conductivities, and repeatabilities were compared. The effects of window size on the contrast ratio, switching speed, power usage, and repeatability were studied.

Type
Articles—Organic Electronics Special Section
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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References

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