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Quasi-continuum study of the buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanocones subjected to bending under thermal loading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2017

Xiangyang Wang*
Affiliation:
School of Transportation, Ludong University, Yantai 264025, Shandong, China
Huibo Qi
Affiliation:
School of Transportation, Ludong University, Yantai 264025, Shandong, China
Zhongyu Sun
Affiliation:
School of Transportation, Ludong University, Yantai 264025, Shandong, China
Xiaojing Wang
Affiliation:
School of Transportation, Ludong University, Yantai 264025, Shandong, China
Xiushu Song
Affiliation:
School of Transportation, Ludong University, Yantai 264025, Shandong, China
Jinbao Wang
Affiliation:
School of Shipping and Ports Architecture Engineering, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316022, China
Xu Guo*
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023, China
*
a) Address all correspondence to these authors. e-mail: wxy017@126.com
b) e-mail: guoxu@dlut.edu.cn
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Abstract

In this study, the buckling behaviors of single-walled carbon nanocones (SWCNCs) under bending at finite temperatures are predicted using a proposed multiscale quasi-continuum approach based on the temperature-dependent higher order Cauchy–Born (THCB) rule. The hyper-elastic constitutive model is derived exactly in the context of the higher order gradient theory that incorporates the details of the interatomic interaction. The numerical simulations for the deformation of SWCNCs are implemented using the developed meshless computational framework based on moving least-squares interpolation, which can precisely reproduce the deformation process and buckling patterns of SWCNCs under bending. The underlying correlations of the critical bending angle with respect to the geometry of SWCNCs and temperature are revealed by the numerical results. Furthermore, our simulation captures the transformation from the local to the global buckling process of SWCNCs, accompanied with an average strain energy jump. Our results correspond with previous studies.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2017 

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Footnotes

Contributing Editor: Susan B. Sinnott

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Quasi-continuum study of the buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanocones subjected to bending under thermal loading
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