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Preparation of alumino-phosphate glass by microwave radiation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 July 2013

Ashis K. Mandal
Affiliation:
Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India
Kaushik Biswas
Affiliation:
Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India
Kalyandurg Annapurna
Affiliation:
Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India
Chandan Guha
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, India
Ranjan Sen
Affiliation:
Glass Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India
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Abstract

This work reports the preparation of iron-doped alumino-phosphate glass using microwave (MW) radiation at 1723 K in comparision with a conventional resistance heating furnace at the same temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis of the sample prepared in an MW furnace has confirmed glass formation which is similar to that of glass prepared in an electric furnace. Glass transition temperatures (T g) for MW and conventional melted glass samples were observed to be 866 and 873 K, respectively. Higher Fe2+/(Fe3+ + Fe2+) ratio was reported in glass prepared in the MW furnace compared with the conventional furnace. The Fourier transform infrared spectra for both the samples indicate identical nature. It was observed that the maximum power required for melting glass in MW heating was 0.85 kW, which is around 25–30% of the power consumed by the conventional resistance heating furnace. In addition, the time needed to melt the glass in the MW furnace was found to be 3–4-fold lesser than the time required in the resistance heating furnace.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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