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Plasma deposition and characterization of acrylic acid thin film on ZnO nanoparticles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Donglu Shi
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221–0012
Peng He
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221–0012
Jie Lian
Affiliation:
Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
Lumin Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
Wim J. van Ooij
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221–0012
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Abstract

Acrylic acid polymer thin films were deposited on the surfaces of nanoparticles of ZnO using a plasma polymerization treatment. The average size of nanoparticles was on the order of 50 nm in irregular shapes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) experiments showed that an extremely thin film of the acrylic acid layer (15 nm) was uniformly deposited on the surfaces of the nanoparticles. The HRTEM results were confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The effect of plasma power on the polyacrylic thin film was studied by Fourier transform infrared experiments. The deposition mechanisms and the effects of plasma treatment parameters are discussed.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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