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Nanocrystalline titanium-magnesium alloys through mechanical alloying

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

C. Suryanarayana
Affiliation:
Wright Research and Development Center, WRDC/MLLS, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433-6533
F. H. Froes
Affiliation:
Institute for Materials and Advanced Processes, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83843-4140
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Abstract

The solid solubility of magnesium in titanium under equilibrium conditions is reported to be extremely small. Mechanical alloying of a mixture of titanium and magnesium powders resulted in the formation of nanocrystalline (10–15 nm in size) grains of Ti–Mg solid solution. This solid solution has a metastable fcc structure with a = 0.426 nm and contains about 3 wt.% (6 at.%) magnesium in it. It is suggested that the fcc structure has formed as a result of the heavy mechanical deformation of the hep structure introduced during milling. High temperature annealing of the metastable solid solution led to its decomposition forming the equilibrium phases, viz., elemental titanium and magnesium.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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