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Modification of titania nanoparticles for photocatalytic antibacterial activity via a colloidal route with glycine and subsequent annealing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 August 2012

Mamoru Senna*
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Technologie des Poudres, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland; and Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, J-223-8522 Yokohama, Japan
Nicholas Myers
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Technologie des Poudres, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Anne Aimable
Affiliation:
Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Céramique Industrielle, Limoges 87068, France
Vincent Laporte
Affiliation:
Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Cesar Pulgarin
Affiliation:
Groupe de Procédés Avancés d’Oxydation, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Oualid Baghriche
Affiliation:
Groupe de Procédés Avancés d’Oxydation, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Paul Bowen
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Technologie des Poudres, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: senna@applc.keio.ac.jp
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Abstract

Changes in the colloid-chemical and photocatalytic properties of titania nanoparticles by attrition milling in the presence of glycine (Gly) and subsequent heat treatment were examined. By milling at 1500 rpm for 6 h, the average particle size was decreased from 123 to 85 nm, with simultaneous decrease in the specific surface area from 35.1 to 23.5 m2/g. Interfacial reactions between titania and Gly were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, from the blue shift of the COO related vibrational bands by 25 cm−1, relative to the same band from the pristine Gly. The bimodal N1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peak similar to that from the reported titania—amino acid complex is another indication of the complex formation with the participation of nitrogen. When the dispersion was dried and calcined at 500 °C in air, the powder exhibited pale yellow color. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy showed significant visible light absorption, suggesting nitrogen incorporation into titania. The fired product showed high photocatalytic antibacterial activity by irradiation of blue light centered at around 440 nm, using Escherichia coli as a specimen of bacterial species. Thus, the present Gly-modified titania nanoparticles could be used for eliminating indoor bacteria under soft blue illumination. The series of interfacial chemical processes involved are also discussed.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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