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Microstructure characteristics of spray-formed high speed steel and its evolution during subsequent hot deformation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2016

Lin Lu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Long-gang Hou*
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Jin-xiang Zhang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
He-bin Wang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Hua Cui
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Jin-feng Huang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Yong-an Zhang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Non-Ferrous Metals and Process, General Research Institute for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing 100088, China
Ji-Shan Zhang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: lghou@skl.ustb.edu.cn
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Abstract

The microstructural evolution of spray-formed high speed steel during hot deformation was investigated as well as the effects of spray forming parameters on the porosity formation. Four distinct zones are identified in the as-deposited material, and interstitial porosity is present in the bottom and peripheral zones, while gas-related porosity is mainly found in the central zone. It can keep the porosity at a minimum value by using the optimum parameters, e.g., the average porosity of central zone is 3.7% for a superheat of 170 °C and a gas-to-metal flow rate of 0.7. During hot deformation at 1150 °C, the amount of porosity can be obviously decreased by increasing the height reduction which also plays a key role in breaking up eutectic carbides. The critical height reduction for the breakdown of the eutectic carbides is 50%, the dominant mechanism being mechanical fragmentation.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2016 

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