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Impression stress relaxation of Sn3.5Ag eutectic alloy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Fuqian Yang*
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506
Lingling Peng
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506
Kenji Okazaki
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: fyang0@engr.uky.edu
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Abstract

The reliability of microelectronic interconnections depends on hot deformation of solders. In this work, we studied the localized stress relaxation of Sn3.5Ag eutectic alloy using the impression testing in the temperature range of 393–488 K. By incorporating the effect of internal stress in the analysis, we obtained the strain rate-stress exponent of 6.59. The activation energy for the stress relaxation is in the range from 38.6 to 43.8 kJ/mol, which compares well with the estimated activation energy of dislocation pipe diffusion, 46 kJ/mol, in pure tin. This suggests that a single mechanism of dislocation climb limited by dislocation pipe diffusion might be the controlling mechanism for the localized stress relaxation of the Sn3.5Ag eutectic alloy.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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