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Immiscibility between two rutile phases in the GeO2–TiO2 system and application as a temperature sensor in high-pressure experiments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 September 2019

Kurt Leinenweber
Affiliation:
Eyring Materials Center, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA
Emil Stoyanov*
Affiliation:
Hyperion Materials & Technologies, Worthington, Ohio 43085, USA
Abds-Sami Malik
Affiliation:
Hyperion Materials & Technologies, Worthington, Ohio 43085, USA
*Corresponding
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: emil.stoyanov@hyperionmt.com, emil.sto@gmail.com
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Abstract

The system GeO2–TiO2 was studied experimentally at high pressure and temperature to measure the miscibility of the two components and to test its applicability as a temperature sensor in high-pressure experiments. Significant solubility between the two end-members was found, with two coexisting solid solutions at high pressure exhibiting mutual solubility that increases with temperature along a solvus. The two solid solution compositions at the solvus can be distinguished readily by X-ray diffraction. At higher temperatures, a complete solid solution exists between the two end-members. The complete solution occurs above a critical line in PT space (a critical point at each pressure). The critical point is located near 1630 °C and mole fraction ${X_{{\rm{Ti}}{{\rm{O}}_{\rm{2}}}}} = 0.57$ at 6.6 GPa and changes by 60 ± 5° per GPa in the region from 4 to 7 GPa. A model for the shape of the solvus is developed using X-ray diffraction data points from a series of quench experiments and an in situ experiment, and the model is used to estimate the thermal gradients in a Kawai-type multianvil assembly.

Keywords

Type
Invited Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

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Immiscibility between two rutile phases in the GeO2–TiO2 system and application as a temperature sensor in high-pressure experiments
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