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Hydrothermal synthesis and visible light photocatalytic activities of Zn3(VO4)2 nanorods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 November 2014

Hongxu Guo*
Affiliation:
College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000, People's Republic of China
Di Guo*
Affiliation:
College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000, People's Republic of China
Zishan Zheng
Affiliation:
College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000, People's Republic of China
Weng Wen
Affiliation:
College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000, People's Republic of China
Jianhua Chen
Affiliation:
College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000, People's Republic of China
*Corresponding
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: guohx@mnnu.edu.cn
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Abstract

Zn3(VO4)2 nanorods with visible light-driven photocatalytic activity were prepared by hydrothermal reaction and characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area and pore size analyzer. The Zn3(VO4)2 nanorods consisted of rods with a thickness of approximately 30 nm, length in the range 400–600 nm, and width in the range 150–250 nm. The photocatalytic degradation activities for methylene blue (MB) and 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) over the Zn3(VO4)2 nanorods were studied in detail. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared photocatalyst for MB and 4-NP in visible light under the same conditions was about 3.5 times and 2.5 times higher than that of N–TiO2, respectively. The main active species in the photodegradation come from •OH, and the photogenerated electrons also partly involved in the photocatalytic degradation process, in which the •OH radicals formed were in proportional to the light illumination time obeying zero-order reaction rate kinetics.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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