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Elevated temperature intergranular cracking of heat-resistant alloy under tensile stress

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2011

Nam-Hoe Heo
Affiliation:
KEPCO Research Institute, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-380, Republic of Korea
Jung-Chel Chang
Affiliation:
KEPCO Research Institute, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-380, Republic of Korea
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Abstract

In a 2.25Cr1.5W heat-resistant alloy, it is shown that the time to intergranular failure under tensile stress t can be expressed by , where t0 is the constant of proportionality, n is the stress exponent, and Q is the activation enthalpy. It is shown that the dimples observed at elevated-temperature intergranular fracture surfaces are not the micro-ductile fracture areas but the interfaces between the grain boundary carbides and the neighboring grains. It is also shown that the segregation concentration of solute atoms is much higher at the grain boundary carbide interfaces than at the carbide-free grain boundaries. Under tensile stress, the elevated-temperature intergranular cracking occurs through the decohesion of grain boundary carbide interfaces, which is followed by the eventual carbide-free grain boundary cracking.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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Elevated temperature intergranular cracking of heat-resistant alloy under tensile stress
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