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Density- and Hardness-optimized Pressureless Sintered and Post-hot Isostatic Pressed B4C

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 2005

Namtae Cho
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
Zhihao Bao
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
Robert F. Speyer
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
Corresponding
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Abstract

Pressureless sintered B4C relative densities as high as 96.7% were obtained by optimizing the soak temperature, and holding at that temperature for the minimum time required to reach terminal density. Although the relative densities of pressureless sintered specimens were lower than that of commercially produced hot-pressed B4C, their (Vickers) hardness values were comparable. For 4.45-cm-diameter, 1.35-cm-high disk-shaped specimens, pressureless sintered to at least 93.0% relative density, post-hot isostatic pressing resulted in vast increases in relative densities (e.g., 100.0%) and hardness values significantly greater than that of commercially produced hot-pressed B4C.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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