Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-g56fq Total loading time: 0.326 Render date: 2023-02-09T04:23:14.635Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

A de novo theranostic nanomedicine composed of PEGylated graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles for cancer therapy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2020

Hadi Samadian
Affiliation:
Nano Drug Delivery Research Center, Health Technology Institute, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
Rahim Mohammad-Rezaei
Affiliation:
Electrochemistry Research Laboratory, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz, Iran
Rana Jahanban-Esfahlan
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Advanced Medical Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
Bakhshali Massoumi
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University, Tehran, Iran
Mojtaba Abbasian
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University, Tehran, Iran
Abbas Jafarizad
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz, Iran
Mehdi Jaymand*
Affiliation:
Nano Drug Delivery Research Center, Health Technology Institute, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: m_jaymand@yahoo.com, m.jaymand@gmail.com
Get access

Abstract

A de novo drug delivery nanosystem based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs), decorated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and folate (FA)-conjugated graphene oxide (GO) was designed and developed successfully. Initially, the graphite (G) powder was oxidized to the GO, and then functionalized with chloroacetic acid to afford a carboxylated graphene oxide (GO–COOH). The obtained GO–COOH was functionalized with an amine end-caped PEG, FA, as well as 3-amino-1-propanethiol to produce a GO–PEG–FA–SH. In another experimental section, GNPs were synthesized through a citrate-mediated reduction approach, and subsequently decorated onto/into GO–PEG–FA–SH through the formation of Au–S bond to afford a GO–PEG–FA/GNP nanosystem. The resultant nanosystem was loaded with doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) as a model anticancer drug, and its drug-loading capacity as well as pH-dependent drug release behavior were investigated. The anticancer activity of the developed theranostic nanomedicine was extensively evaluated using MTT assay against human breast cancer cells (MCF7). The developed GO–PEG–FA/GNPs–DOX theranostic nanomedicine exhibited an excellent cancer chemotherapy feature. In addition, this nanomedicine can be used in chemo-photothermal therapy of solid tumors because of the presence of GO and GNPs in its structure.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

W.H. Organization, Cancer, Fact Sheet #297, 2011.Google Scholar
Poorgholy, N., Massoumi, B., and Jaymand, M.: A novel starch-based stimuli-responsive nanosystem for theranostic applications. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 97, 654 (2017).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Massoumi, B., Poorgholy, N., and Jaymand, M.: Multistimuli responsive polymeric nanosystems for theranostic applications. Int. J. Polym. Mater. Polym. Biomater. 66, 38 (2017).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swierczewska, M., Han, H.S., Kim, K., Park, J.H., and Lee, S.: Polysaccharide-based nanoparticles for theranostic nanomedicine. Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev. 99, 70 (2016).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Elzoghby, A.O., Hemasa, A.L., and Freag, M.S.: Hybrid protein-inorganic nanoparticles: From tumor-targeted drug delivery to cancer imaging. J. Control. Release 243, 303 (2016).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Muthu, M.S., Leong, D.T., Mei, L., and Feng, S.S.: Nanotheranostics—Application and further development of nanomedicine strategies for advanced theranostics. Theranostics 4, 660 (2014).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smith, B.R. and Gambhir, S.S.: Nanomaterials for in vivo imaging. Chem. Rev. 117, 901 (2017).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chen, Y., Wu, Y., Sun, B., Liu, S., and Liu, H.: Two-dimensional nanomaterials for cancer nanotheranostics. Small 13, 1603446 (2017).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alibolandi, M., Mohammadi, M., Taghdisi, S.M., Ramezani, M., and Abnous, K.: Fabrication of aptamer decorated dextran coated nano-grapheneoxide for targeted drug delivery. Carbohydr. Polym. 155, 218 (2017).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hemmati, K., Sahraei, R., and Ghaemy, M.: Synthesis and characterization of a novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer with incorporated graphene oxide for drug delivery. Polymer 101, 257 (2016).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shen, J., Zhu, Y., Yang, X., and Li, C.: Graphene quantum dots: Emergent nanolights for bioimaging, sensors, catalysis, and photovoltaic devices. Chem. Commun. 48, 3686 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Afsharan, H., Khalilzadeh, B., Tajalli, H., Mollabashi, M., Navaeipour, F., and Rashidi, M.R.: A sandwich type immunosensor for ultrasensitive electrochemical quantification of p53 protein based on gold nanoparticles/graphene oxide. Electrochim. Acta 188, 153 (2016).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Massoumi, B., Ghandomi, F., Abbasian, M., Eskandani, M., and Jaymand, M.: Surface functionalization of graphene oxide with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) and its electrospun nanofibers with gelatin. Appl. Phys. A: Solids Surf. 122, 1000 (2016).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, W., Guo, Z., Huang, D., Liu, Z., Guo, X., and Zhong, H.: Synergistic effect of chemo-photothermal therapy using PEGylated graphene oxide. Biomaterials 32, 8555 (2011).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jafarizad, A., Taghizadehgh-Alehjougi, A., Eskandani, M., Hatamzadeh, M., Abbasian, M., Mohammad-Rezaei, R., Mohammadzadeh, M., Toğar, B., and Jaymand, M.: PEGylated graphene oxide/Fe3O4 nanocomposite: Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of its performance as de novo drug delivery nanosystem. Bio-Med. Mater. Eng. 29, 177 (2018).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Abbasiana, M., Roudi, M.M., Mahmoodzadeh, F., Eskandani, M., and Jaymand, M.: Chitosan-grafted-poly(methacrylic acid)/graphene oxide nanocomposite as a pH-responsive de novo cancer chemotherapy nanosystem. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 118, 1871 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xu, Z., Zhu, S., Wang, M., Li, Y., Shi, P., and Huang, X.: Delivery of paclitaxel using PEGylated graphene oxide as a nanocarrier. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 7, 1355 (2015).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Orecchioni, M., Cabizza, R., Bianco, A., and Delogu, L.G.: Graphene as cancer theranostic tool: Progress and future challenges. Theranostics 5, 710 (2015).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chen, L., Zhong, X., Yi, X., Huang, M., Ning, P., Liu, T., Ge, C., Chai, Z., Liu, Z., and Yang, K.: Radionuclide 131I labeled reduced graphene oxide for nuclear imaging guided combined radio- and photothermal therapy of cancer. Biomaterials 66, 21 (2015).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yang, K., Hu, L., Ma, X., Ye, S., Cheng, L., Shi, X., Li, C., Li, Y., and Liu, Z.: Multimodal imaging guided photothermal therapy using functionalized graphene nanosheets anchored with magnetic nanoparticles. Adv. Mater. 24, 1868 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thapa, R.K., Youn, Y.S., Jeong, J.H., Choi, H.G., Yong, C.S., and Kim, J.O.: Graphene oxide-wrapped PEGylated liquid crystalline nanoparticles foreffective chemo-photothermal therapy of metastatic prostate cancer cells. Colloids Surf., B 143, 271 (2016).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yang, K., Feng, L., and Liu, Z.: Stimuli responsive drug delivery systems based on nano-graphene for cancer therapy. Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev. 105, 228 (2016).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bianco, A.: Graphene: Safe or toxic? The two faces of the medal. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 52, 4986 (2013).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chowdhury, S.M., Surhland, C., Sanchez, Z., Chaudhary, P., Kumar, M.A.S., Lee, S., Pena, L.A., Waring, M., Sitharaman, B., and Naidu, M.: Graphene nanoribbons as a drug delivery agent for lucanthone mediated therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Nanomed. Nanotechnol. Biol. Med. 11, 109 (2015).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wang, C., Wu, C.Y., Zhou, X.J., Han, T., Xin, X.Z., Wu, J.Y., Zhang, J.Y., and Guo, S.W.: Enhancing cell nucleus accumulation and DNA cleavage activity of anti-cancer drug via graphene quantum dots. Sci. Rep. 3, 2852 (2013).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Khalilzadeh, B., Shadjou, N., Eskandani, M., Nozad-Charoudehd, H., Omidi, Y., and Rashidi, M.R.: A reliable self-assembled peptide based electrochemical biosensor for detection of caspase 3 activity and apoptosis. RSC Adv. 5, 58316 (2015).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, H., Shao, L., Li, Q., and Wang, J.: Gold nanorods and their plasmon properties. Chem. Soc. Rev. 42, 2679 (2013).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Murphy, C.J., Stone, J.W., Sisco, P.N., Alkilany, A.M., Goldsmith, E.C., and Baxter, S.C.: Gold nanoparticles in biology: Beyond toxicity to cellular imaging. Acc. Chem. Res. 41, 1721 (2008).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Melancon, M.P., Lu, W., Yang, Z., Zhang, R., Cheng, Z., Elliot, A.M., Stafford, J., Olson, T., Zhang, J.Z., and Li, C.: In vitro and in vivo targeting of hollow gold nanoshells directed at epidermal growth factor receptor for photothermal ablation therapy. Mol. Cancer Ther. 7, 1730 (2008).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chen, J., Glaus, C., Laforest, R., Zhang, Q., Yang, M., Gidding, M., Welch, M.J., and Xia, Y.: Gold nanocages as photothermal transducer for cancer treatment. Small 6, 811 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Luo, D., Carter, K.A., Miranda, D., and Lovell, J.F.: Chemophototherapy: An emerging treatment option for solid tumors. Adv. Sci. 24, 1600106 (2016).Google Scholar
Mahmoodzadeh, F., Abbasian, M., Jaymand, M., Salehi, R., and Bagherzadeh-Khajehmarjan, E.: A novel gold-based stimuli-responsive theranostic nanomedicine for chemo-photothermal therapy of solid tumors. Mater. Sci. Eng. C 93, 880 (2018).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Qi, Z., Shi, J., Zhang, Z., Cao, Y., Li, J., and Cao, S.: PEGylated graphene oxide-capped gold nanorods/silica nanoparticles as multifunctional drug delivery platform with enhanced near-infrared responsiveness. Mater. Sci. Eng. C 104, 109889 (2019).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zhang, Z., Shi, J., Song, Z., Zhu, X., Zhu, Y., and Cao, S.: A synergistically enhanced photothermal transition effect from mesoporous silica nanoparticles with gold nanorods wrapped in reduced graphene oxide. J. Mater. Sci. 53, 1810 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gurunathan, S., Han, J.W., Dayem, A.A., Eppakayala, V., and Kim, J.H.: Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Int. J. Nanomed. 7, 5901 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, H.K., Qi, M., Mo, L., Yang, R.M., Xu, X.D., Bao, J.F., Tang, W.J., Lin, J.T., Zhang, L.M., and Jiang, X.Q.: Reduction-sensitive amphiphilic dextran derivatives as theranostic nanocarriers for chemotherapy and MR imaging. RSC Adv. 6, 114519 (2016).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Massoumi, B., Mozaffari, Z., and Jaymand, M.: A starch-based stimuli-responsive magnetite nanohydrogel as de novo drug delivery system. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 117, 418 (2018).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jaymand, M., Lotfi, M., Barar, J., Eskandani, M., and Maleki, H.: Novel dental nanocomposites: Fabrication, and investigation of their physicochemical, mechanical and biological properties. Bull. Mater. Sci. 41, 84 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A de novo theranostic nanomedicine composed of PEGylated graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles for cancer therapy
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

A de novo theranostic nanomedicine composed of PEGylated graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles for cancer therapy
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

A de novo theranostic nanomedicine composed of PEGylated graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles for cancer therapy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *