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Characteristics of dielectric layers formed by low-temperature vacuum ultraviolet-assisted oxidation of SiGe layers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Valentin Craciun
Affiliation:
Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, United Kingdom
Ian W. Boyd
Affiliation:
Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, United Kingdom
Jacques Perriere
Affiliation:
Groupe de Physique des Solides, Universities Paris VII et VI, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 Paris Cedex 05, France
Bernie Hutton
Affiliation:
Chemistry Department, University College London, London, United Kingdom
Edward J. Nicholls
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Physics, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Thin Si0.8Ge0.2 layers epitaxially grown on (100) Si substrates were oxidized at temperatures from 150 to 450 °C under vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation emitted by an excimer lamp working with Xe (λ = 172 nm). The structure and composition of the grown dielectric layers were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reactions analysis, ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These investigations have shown that, during the VUV-assisted oxidation process, Ge atoms were initially rejected from the grown SiO2 layer even at temperatures as low as those employed here. After a certain quantity of Ge accumulated at the interface, nanocrystalline Ge regions were directly excised from the remaining SiGe layer becoming embedded within the advancing SiO2 layer. The layers containing these nanocrystalline Ge particles exhibited the same visible photoluminescence spectra as those recorded from layers already known to contain nanocrystalline Ge or GeO2 particles, porous Ge, or nanocrystalline Ge particles exhibiting a different crystalline structure. This seems to indicate that the shell region of the nanocrystalline particle, and not its crystalline core, is the source of the photoluminescence.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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References

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