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Carbon nanotubes grown on different-sized rectangular patterns

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Lujun Pan
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-Cha, Osaka 599-8531, Japan
Yoshikazu Nakayama
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-Cha, Osaka 599-8531, Japan
Hideki Shiozaki
Affiliation:
Hitachi Zosen Co. LTD., 2-11, Funamachi Z-chome, Taisho-ku, Osaka 551-0022, Japan
Chikashi Inazumi
Affiliation:
Hitachi Zosen Co. LTD., 2-11, Funamachi Z-chome, Taisho-ku, Osaka 551-0022, Japan
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Abstract

Carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a thin iron film as catalyst on the silicon substrate with different-sized rectangular patterns. It is found that the carbon nanotubes grow vertically to the substrate in a high density with a surface shape similar to that of the substrate when the line width of the patterns are larger than 1 μm, However, when the line width of the pattern is reduced to below 0.5 μm, carbon nanotubes cannot grow vertically anymore. This phenomenon might be caused by the relaxation of stress in catalyst film and the coalescence of the catalyst clusters to form particles or grains, which contributes to the migration of catalyst from edge to inner part during the nucleation process. These results are very useful for the fabrication of field-emission displays and other devices using patterned carbon nanotubes.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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