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Bulk processing of high-performance nanocrystalline intermetallics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

C. H. Shang
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21212
R. C. Cammarata
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21212
C. Van Heerden
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21212
T. P. Weihs
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21212
C. L. Chien
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21212
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Abstract

We present an inexpensive, bulk-processing technique for the mass fabrication of a high-performance, nanocrystalline intermetallic with no internal flaws: the recrystallization of plastically deformed ingots through controlled heat treatments. We demonstrate that FeCo alloys with average grain sizes of 100 nm can be produced using this method. The nanocrystalline materials have tensile yield strengths as high as 2.2 GPa and have plastic tensile ductilities over 1.3%. Such superior properties at room temperature are currently unattainable when nanocrystalline materials are prepared by other methods.

Type
Rapid Communications
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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