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Anisotropic thermal conductivity of rare earth–transition metal thin films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

L.J. Shaw-Klein
Affiliation:
Materials Science Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0133 and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299
T.K. Hatwar
Affiliation:
Mass Memory Division Research Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York 14650-2017
S.J. Burns
Affiliation:
Materials Science Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0133
S.D. Jacobs
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299
J.C. Lambropoulos
Affiliation:
Materials Science Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0133
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Abstract

Thermal conductivity measurements were performed on several amorphous rare earth transition metal thin films of varying microstructure. The thermal conductivity perpendicular to the plane of the film, measured by the thermal comparator method, was compared with the thermal conductivity value measured parallel to the plane of the film. The latter value was obtained by converting electrical conductivity values to thermal conductivity via the Wiedemann–Franz relationship. As expected, the columnar microstructure induced during the sputter deposition of the thin films causes an anisotropy in the thermal conductivity values, with the in-plane values consistently lower than the out-of-plane values. The effect is most pronounced for the more columnar films deposited at higher pressure, for which the in-plane thermal conductivity, 0.3 W/mK, is an order of magnitude lower than the out-of-plane thermal conductivity, 4.3 W/mK. The thermal conductivity out of the plane of the film decreased with increasing deposition pressure, due to the decreasing film density.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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