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Analysis of residual stresses in diamond coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide substrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Zhenqing Xu
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620
Leonid Lev
Affiliation:
R&D Center, General Motors Corporation, Warren, Michigan 48090
Michael Lukitsch
Affiliation:
R&D Center, General Motors Corporation, Warren, Michigan 48090
Ashok Kumar*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: akumar@eng.usf.edu
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Abstract

Residual stresses in diamond films grown on WC–Co substrates have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and curvature methods. Microcrystalline diamond films were deposited at 650–700 °C in a conventional hydrogen–methane environment by the microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The film thickness, measured from cross-sectional micrographs taken by scanning electron microscopy, changed from 1.5 to 16.5 μm as the growth time increased from 1 to 12 h. The type and the magnitude of the total residual stress obtained from curvature and XRD measurements agreed very well in all of the samples and changed from tensile to compressive as film thickness increased. However, Raman spectroscopy results showed that all films exhibited compressive stress due to the domain size effect. Different methane fractions, varying from 1% to 3%, have been utilized for diamond growth, and the total residual stress increased as more methane was included.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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