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Analysis of crystallization behavior of Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6 bulk metallic glass by synchrotron radiation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

T.A. Baser
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Chimica, IFM and NIS/INSTM/CNISM, Università di Torino, 10125 Torino, Italy
M. Baricco
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Chimica, IFM and NIS/INSTM/CNISM, Università di Torino, 10125 Torino, Italy
S. Enzo
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari, Italy
G. Vaughan
Affiliation:
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), F-38043 Grenoble Cedex, France
A.R. Yavari
Affiliation:
Laboratorie de Thermodynamique et Physico-chimie Metallurgique (LTPCM-UMR 5614), Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, CNRS, 38402 Grenoble, France
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Abstract

The amorphous-to-crystalline transformation behavior of Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6 bulk metallic glasses was first investigated by high-temperature differential scanning calorimetry. Three events were detected with onset temperatures at 922, 975, and 1036 K, respectively. In situ synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction patterns were collected during continuous heating and analyzed with the Rietveld approach. To describe simultaneously the amorphous fraction and crystallization products as a function of temperature, a paracrystalline structure-factor model was developed. It was included for quantitative evaluation of the amorphous phase, together with the structure factor of Cr23C6- and Fe3Mo3C-type phases observed during crystallization. Volume fractions of phases as well as lattice parameters, average lattice disorder, and crystallite size of the crystallized phases have been followed as a function of temperature. In this way, the structure evolution and thermal events have been closely inspected and accounted for by a crystallization mechanism.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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Analysis of crystallization behavior of Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6 bulk metallic glass by synchrotron radiation
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