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Alloying effects of iridium on glass formation and glass-forming ability of the Zr–Cu–Al system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

H.X. Li
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China
H. Bei
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6115
Z.P. Lu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China
Corresponding
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Abstract

Alloying effects of iridium on the glass formability (GFA) of the Zr–Ir–Cu–Al system have been investigated, and several new bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high GFA have been successfully developed. Additions of Ir in the Zr–Cu–Al system can yield a beneficial distribution in atomic sizes, but the strong chemical interaction of the Zr–Ir atomic pair limits the maximum addable Ir contents and the resultant GFA. Our analyses indicate that the optimum composition for alloying elements is determined by not only topological but also chemical factors. Phase competition upon solidification, rather than effects from individual affecting factors, dictates the GFA of BMG systems.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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Alloying effects of iridium on glass formation and glass-forming ability of the Zr–Cu–Al system
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