Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-wsxd2 Total loading time: 0.185 Render date: 2023-02-06T04:24:54.904Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

(Uncontrolled) Donation after Cardiac Determination of Death: A Note of Caution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

Extract

“I think there’s a big strong belief in [...] the community … and maybe it’s in the world at large that somehow the doctors are more concerned about harvesting the organs than what’s best for the patient.”1 In the past 45 years, organ and tissue recovery and transplantation have moved from the occasional and experimental to a standard of care for end-stage organ failure; receiving an organ transplant is for many the only opportunity for increased quantity and/or quality of life. The increasing prevalence of diseases such as viral hepatitis, diabetes, and hypertension has significantly increased the incidence of end-organ failure. Additionally, surgical advances have permitted less stringent qualification criteria, so that people of advanced age or patients who may be in a physiologically fragile state are now eligible to be organ recipients. These changes have created a significant demand for organs.

Type
Symposium
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Goodwin, M., Black Markets: The Supply and Demand of Body Parts (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006): at 50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anonymous, “A Definition of Irreversible Coma: Report of the Ad Hoc Committee of the Harvard Medical School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death,” JAMA 205, no. 6 (1968): 337340.Google Scholar
Shemie, S. D., Doig, C. and Belitsky, P., “Advancing toward a Modern Death: The Path from Severe Brain Injury to Neurological Determination of Death,” Canadian Medical Association Journal 168, no. 8 (2003): 993995; Barnieh, L., Baxter, D., Boiteau, P., Manns, B. and Doig, C., “Benchmarking Performance in Organ Donation Programs: Dependence on Demographics and Mortality Rates,” Canadian Journal of Anesthesiology 53, no. 7 (2006): 727-731.Google Scholar
Alvarez, J., del Barrio, M. R. and Arias, J. et al., “Five Years of Experience with Non-Heart-Beating Donors Coming from the Streets,” Transplantation Proceedings 34, no. 7 (2002): 25892590.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Potts, J. T., Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement (Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1997): at 60.Google Scholar
Willms, D. C., Atkins, P. J., Dembitsky, W. P., Jaski, B. E. and Gocka, I., “Analysis of Clinical Trends in a Program of Emergent ECLS for Cardiovascular Collapse,” American Society for Artificial Internal Organs Journal 43, no. 1 (1997): 6568.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nichol, G., Karmy-Jones, R., Salerno, C., Cantore, L. and Becker, L., “Systematic Review of Percutaneous Cardiopulmonary Bypass for Cardiac Arrest or Cardiogenic Shock States,” Resuscitation 70, no. 3 (2006): 381394, at 385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Childress, J. F. and Liverman, C. T., eds., Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action (Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press, 2006): at 128–169.Google Scholar
Lombardi, G., Gallagher, J. and Gennis, P., “Outcome of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in New York City: Pre-Hospital Arrest Survival Evaluation (PHASE) Study,” JAMA 271, no. 9 (1994): 678–83.Google Scholar
Cobb, L. A., Fahrenbruch, C. E., Olsufka, M. and Copass, M. K., “Changing Incidence of Out-of-Hospital Ventricular Fibrillation,” JAMA 288, no. 23 (2002): 30083013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Committee on Non-Heart-Beating Transplantation II, Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Practice and Protocols (Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2000); Schapiro, R., ed., Arnold, R. M. and Youngner, S. J., guest eds., “Special Issue: Ethical, Psychosocial, and Public Policy Implications of Procuring Organs from Non-Heart Beating Cadavers,” Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3, no. 2 (1993); see Potts, , supra note 5.Google Scholar
Light, J. A., Kowalski, A. E., Sasaki, T. M., Barhyte, D. Y., Ritchie, W. O., Gage, F. and Harviel, J. D., “A Rapid Organ Recovery Program for Non-Heart-Beating Donors,” Transplantation Proceedings 29, no. 8 (1997): 35533556.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Verheijde, J. L., Rady, M. Y. and McGregor, J., “Recovery of Transplantable Organs after Cardiac or Circulatory Death: Transforming the Paradigm for the Ethics of Organ Donation,” Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2, no. 8 (2007): available at <http://www.peh-med.com/content/pdf/1747-5341-2-8.pdf> (last visited September 24, 2008): at 4.Google Scholar
Woien, S., Rady, M. Y., Verheijde, J. L. and McGregor, J., “Organ Procurement Organizations Internet Enrollment for Organ Donation: Abandoning Informed Consent,” BMC Medical Ethics 7, no. E14, available at <http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1472-6939-7-14.pdf> (last visited September 24, 2008).Google Scholar
Keenan, S. P., Hoffmaster, B., Rutledge, F., Eberhard, J., Chen, L. and Sibbald, W., “Attitudes Regarding Organ Donation from Non-heart-beating Donor,” Journal of Critical Care 17, no. 1 (2002): 2936.Google Scholar
Canadian Council for Donation and Transplantation, Donation after Cardiocirculatory Death: Public Opinion Survey, December 2005, available at <http://www.ccdt.ca/english/media/mediapdfs/DCD_Public_Survey_Summary_News.13Dec05.pdf> (last visited September 24, 2008).+(last+visited+September+24,+2008).>Google Scholar
Delmonico, F. L. and Schwab, P., “Donation after Cardiac Death,” Canadian Medical Association Journal, E-letter, October 2006, available at <http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/eletters/175/8/905#4853> (last visited September 24, 2008).CrossRef+(last+visited+September+24,+2008).>Google Scholar
Rady, M. Y., Verheijde, J. L. and McGregor, J., “Organ Donation after Circulatory Death: The Forgotten Donor?” Critical Care 10, no. 166 (2006): 3.Google Scholar
17
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

(Uncontrolled) Donation after Cardiac Determination of Death: A Note of Caution
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

(Uncontrolled) Donation after Cardiac Determination of Death: A Note of Caution
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

(Uncontrolled) Donation after Cardiac Determination of Death: A Note of Caution
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *