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Editors’ Notes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 May 2022

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Abstract

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Editors’ Notes
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© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Economic History Association

2021 ECONOMIC HISTORY ASSOCIATION MEETINGS

The Economic History Association and President John Wallis would like to thank the following for making the 2021 meeting a success:

Program Committee—Howard Bodenhorn (co-chair), Eric Hilt (co-chair), … Kara Dimitruk, Laura Salisbury, and Marianne Wanamaker

Local Arrangements Committee—Price Fishback (Chair), Taylor Jaworski, Carl Kitchens, Melissa Thomasson

Eller College of Business and the Economics Department at the University of Arizona

The Economic History Students of the University of Arizona Economics Department

Mike Cerneant and Global Financial Data

Laurie Mirman and Site Services

Michael Haupert—Executive Director, EHA

Lana Sooter—EHA Administrative Coordinator

Jeremy Land—Meetings Coordinator, EHA

Roy Eskelinen—EHA Conference Assistant

Taylor Land—EHA Conference Assistant

Cindy Poag

John Wallis

Susan Wolcott, Caroline Fohlin, and Mary Rodgers

Mary Averill and Audrey Ferrante

Ann Carlos

Anne McCants and Ranjit Dighe

Richard Hornbeck and Michela Giorcelli

We also thank the dissertation conveners, session chairs, and discussants:

Daniel Aaronson, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Michael Andrews, UMBC

Belinda Archibong, Barnard College

Jeremy Atack, Vanderbilt University

Hoyt Bleakley, University of Michigan

Dan Bogart, University of California, Irvine

Joyce Burnette, Wabash College

Ann Carlos, University of Colorado

Mark Carlson, Federal Reserve Board of Governors

Elizabeth Cascio, Dartmouth College

Geoff Clarke, Brandeis University

Lisa Cook, Michigan State University

Eric Edwards, North Carolina State University

Jari Eloranta, University of Helsinki

José Espín-Sánchez, Yale University

Rui Esteves, IHEID-Graduate Institute of Geneva

Andreas Ferrara, University of Pittsburgh

Dan Fetter, Stanford University

Price Fishback, University of Arizona

Dustin Frye, Vassar College

Rob Gillezeau, University of Victoria

Walker Hanlon, Northwestern University

Michael Haupert, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse

Philip Hoffman, California Institute of Technology

Richard Hornbeck, University of Chicago

Douglas Irwin, Dartmouth College

Matthew Jaremski, Utah State University

Noel Johnson, George Mason University

Reka Juhasz, Columbia University

Carl Kitchens, Florida State University

Sumner La Croix, University of Hawaii

Peter Lindert, University of California, Davis

Christopher Meissner, University of California, Davis

Melinda Miller, Virginia Tech University

David Mitch, UMBC

Joel Mokyr, Northwestern University

Steven Nafziger, Williams College

Suresh Naidu, New York University

Todd Neumann, University of Arizona

Greg Niemesh, Miami University

Cormac Ó Gráda, University College Dublin

Sheilagh Ogilvie, University of Oxford

Martha Olney, University of California, Berkeley

John Parman, College of William and Mary

Elisabeth Perlman, U.S. Census Bureau

Jonathan Pritchett, Tulane University

Paul Rhode, University of Michigan

Kilian Rieder, Osterreichische Nationalbank and CEPR

Mary Rodgers, State University of New York-Oswego

Jonathan Rose, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Joshua Rosenbloom, Iowa State University

Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, California Institute of Technology

Jared Rubin, Chapman University

Laura Salisbury, York University

Edson Severnini, Carnegie Mellon University

Katherine Shester, Washington and Lee University

Carol Shiue, University of Colorado

Bryan Stuart, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

Pat Testa, Tulane University

Christoph Trebesch, Kiel Institute

Erin Troland, Federal Reserve Board of Governors

Marianne Wanamaker, University of Tennessee

Simone Wegge, City University of New York

Barry Weingast, Stanford University

Gavin Wright, Stanford University

Guo Xu, University of California, Berkeley

Melanie Xue, London School of Economics

2022 MEETING OF THE ECONOMIC HISTORY ASSOCIATION 16–18 SEPTEMBER 2022

The eighty-second annual meeting of the Economic History Association will be held in La Crosse, Wisconsin on 16–18 September 2022. The theme of the meeting is “Hidden Figures.” The papers chosen are as follows.

SESSION 1: AGRICULTURE AROUND THE WORLD

Eric Edwards, North Carolina State University and Wally Thurman, North Carolina State University, “Private Benefits and Public Goods: Agricultural Drainage in the United States 1850–1969”

Terry Cheung, Academia Sinica, Shaowen Luo, Virginia Tech, and Kwok Ping Tsang, Virginia Tech, “Letting Old Data Speak: Local Cultural Traits in Qing China Grain Prices”

Viet Nguyen, Northeastern University and Susan Wolcott, Binghamton University, “Caste and Landlessness in India at Independence”

SESSION 2: WORLD WAR II

Gillian Brunet, Wesleyan University, “Household Saving in World War II”

Chris Vickers, Auburn University and Nicolas Ziebarth, Auburn University, “The Effects of the National War Labor Board on Labor Income Inequality”

Conor Lennon, University of Louisville, “Female Educational Attainment, Marriage, and Fertility: Evidence from the 1944 G.I. Bill”

SESSION 3: HEALTH CAPITAL

Eric Schneider, London School of Economics, “Worldwide Child Stunting since the Nineteenth Century”

Francesca Antman, University of Colorado, Boulder and James Flynn, University of Colorado, Boulder, “When Beer Is Safer than Water: Beer Availability and Mortality from Water-Borne Illnesses in 19th Century England”

Keith Meyers, University of Southern Denmark, “Mass Vaccination and Mortality: Evidence from the US’s Experience with the 1954 Salk Vaccine Trial”

SESSION 4: BUILDING WEALTH IN THE USA

Daniel Hartley, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and Jonathan Rose, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, “Blockbusting and the Challenges Faced by Black Families in Building Wealth through Housing in the Postwar United States”

Claire Celerier, University of Toronto and Purnoor Tak, London Business School, “The Impact of Financial Inclusion on Minorities: Evidence from the Freedman’s Savings Bank”

Rajesh Narayanan, Louisiana State University and Jonathan Pritchett, Tulane University, “The Paradox of Slave Collateral”

SESSION 5: IDENTITY AND SEGREGATION

Ricardo Dahis, PUC-Rio, Emily Nix, University of Southern California, and Nancy Qian, Northwestern University, “Choosing Racial Identity in the United States, 1880–1940”

Isabella Ou, University of Minnesota and Evan Roberts, University of Minnesota, “Linguistic Segregation in the United States, 1900–1930”

Hui Ren Tan, National University of Singapore, “Origins of a Violent Land: The Role of Culture”

SESSION 6: POLITICAL ECONOMY IN AFRICA

Belinda Archibong, Barnard College and Nonso Obikili, Stellenbosch University, “When Women March: The 1929 Aba Women’s Tax Revolt and Gender Gaps in Political Participation in Nigeria”

Jutta Bolt, Lund University, Leigh Gardner, London School of Economics, Jennifer Kohler, London School of Economics, Jack Paine, University of Rochester, and James Robinson, University of Chicago, “African Political Institutions and the Impact of Colonialism”

Marlous van Waijenburg, Harvard Business School and Anne Ruderman, London School of Economics, “(Un)principled Agents: Monitoring Loyalty after the End of the Royal African Company Monopoly”

SESSION 7: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN ASIA

Melanie Meng Xue, London School of Economics and Boxiao Zhang, University of California, Los Angeles, “The Short- and Long-Run Effects of Affirmative Action: Evidence from Imperial China”

Gregg Huff, University of Oxford, “Vent-for-Surplus in Southeast Asian Development since 1870”

Jian Xie, University of Warwick and Song Yuan, University of Warwick, “The Cultural Origins of Family Firms”

SESSION 8: ACCESS TO PUBLIC AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Luis Baldomero Quintana, College of William and Mary, Enrique de la Rosa-Ramos, King’s College, and Guillermo Woo Mara, Paris School of Economics, “Infrastructures of Race? Colonial Indigenous Zoning and Contemporaneous Urban Segregation”

Qingyang Shen, University of Toronto, “Effects of Raising Minimum Housing Standards: Evidence from the Tenement House Act of 1901”

Laura Davidoff Taylor, California Institute of Technology, “Beggar Thy Neighbor: Strategic Resource Depletion and Environmental Outcomes for Water Quality”

SESSION 9: RELIGION AND STATE CAPACITY

Jose Espin-Sanchez, Yale University, Salvador Gil-Guirado, University of Murcia, and Nicholas Ryan, Yale University, “Praying for Rain: The Climate as a Determinant of Religious Belief

Jari Eloranta, University of Helsinki, Petri Karonen, University of Jyväskylä, Henric Häggqvist, Uppsala University, and Jeremy Land, University of Helsinki, “The Quest for Bureaucratic Efficiency: Sweden’s Rise and Fall as an Empire”

Leonard Kukic, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, and Yasin Arslantas, Anadolu University, “Taxes, Religion and Nationalism: Evidence from Six Centuries of Bosnian History”

SESSION 10: WOMEN IN ECONOMIC HISTORY

Maylis Avaro, University of Oxford, Cleo Chassonnery-Zaïgouche, University of Cambridge, and Johanna Gautier Morin, European University Institute, “Counting on International Organizations: Feminist Economics and the Value of Women’s Unpaid Work”

Michael Andrews, University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Yiling Zhao, Peking University, “Home Economics and Women’s Gateway to Science”

Metin Cosgel, University of Connecticut, Hamdi Genç Medeniyet University, Emre Özer, Medeniyet University, and Sadullah Yldrm, Marmara University, “Gender and Justice: Women’s Participation, Settlement, and Victory in Ottoman Courts”

SESSION 11: PERSPECTIVES ON UKRAINE AND RUSSIA

Stephen Broadberry, University of Oxford and Elena Korchmina, University of Southern Denmark, “Catching-Up and Falling Behind: Russian Economic Growth from the 1690s to the 1880s”

Viktor Malein, University of Southern Denmark, “Landed Elite and Expansion of Primary Schooling in Imperial Russia”

Vitaliia Yaremko, University of California, Berkeley, “The Long-Term Consequences of the 1932–33 Famine: Evidence from Post-Soviet Ukraine”

SESSION 12: INDUSTRIALIZATION, PRODUCTIVITY, AND EMPLOYMENT

Jeanne Lafortune, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Ethan Lewis, Dartmouth College, Jose Pablo Martinez, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, and Jose Tessada, Universidad Catolica de Chile, “Changing Returns to Scale in Manufacturing 1880–1930: The Rise of Skilled Labor?”

Karen Clay, Carnegie Mellon University, Akshaya Jha, Carnegie Mellon University, Joshua Lewis, University of Montreal, and Edson Severnini, Carnegie Mellon, “Impacts of the Clean Air Act on the Power Sector from 1938–1994: Anticipation and Adaptation”

Sebastián Galiani, University of Maryland, Luis Jaramillo, University of Maryland, and Mateo Uribe-Castro, Universidad del Rosario, “Free-Riding the Yankees: Manufacturing Productivity in Canada before and after the Panama Canal”

SESSION 13: MOBILITY

Jacqueline Craig, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, Katherine Eriksson, University of California, Davis, Gregory Niemesh, Miami University, and Myera Rashid, Northwestern University, “Marriage and the Intergenerational Mobility of Women: Evidence from Marriage Certificates 1850–1910”

Kasey Buckles, University of Notre Dame, Joseph Price, Brigham Young University, and Zachary Ward, Baylor University, “Family Trees and Falling Apples: Intergenerational Mobility Estimates from U.S. Genealogy Data”

Ezra Karger, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and Peter Nencka, Miami University, “The Democratization of Opportunity: The Effects of the U.S. High School Movement”

SESSION 14: THE INFLUENCE OF CULTURE AND GENDER NORMS

Philipp Ager, University of Mannheim, Marc Goni, University of Bergen, and Kjell G. Salvanes, Norwegian School of Economics, “Gender-Biased Technological Change and Structural Transformation: Evidence from the Diffusion of Milking Machines in Norway”

Miriam Artiles, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, “Within-Group Heterogeneity in a Multi-Ethnic Society”

Karol J. Borowiecki, University of Southern Denmark, Roberto Asmat Belleza, University of Warwick, and Marc Law, University of Vermont, “Competing for Equality: Gender and Racial Disparities in Classical Music Competitions since 1890”

SESSION 15: EXCLUSION FROM MARKETS

Donna Feir, University of Victoria, Maggie Jones, Emory University, and David Scoones, University of Victoria, “The Legacy of Indian Missions in the United States”

Kara Dimitruk, Swarthmore College and Christie Swanepoel, University of Western Cape, “Informal Financial Markets: Borrowing and Lending of the Indigenous Population and Freed Slaves in the Cape Colony”

Hillary Vipond, London School of Economics, “Technological Unemployment in Historical Perspective”

SESSION 16: IBERIAN INFLUENCE

Martin Fernandez-Sanchez, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research and Gaspare Tortorici, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, “Migrant Self-Selection during the Portuguese Mass Migration, 1880–1930”

Alejandro Martinez Marquina, University of Southern California, “When a Town Wins the Lottery: Evidence from Spain”

Luis Roberto Martinez, University of Chicago, Leopoldo Fergusson, Universidad de los Andes, Giorgio Chiovelli, Universidad de Montevideo, Felipe Valencia Caicedo, University of British Columbia, and Juan David Torres, Stanford University, “Bourbon Reforms and State Capacity in the Spanish Empire”

SESSION 17: RACE IN THE UNITED STATES

Robyn Cox, University of Southern California, Jamein Cunningham, Cornell University, and Alberto Ortega, Indiana University, “The Impact of Affirmative Action Litigation on Police Killings of Civilians”

Andrea Bernini, University of Oxford, Giovanni Facchini, University of Nottingham, Marco Tabellini, Harvard Business School, and Cecilia Testa, University of Nottingham, “The Voting Rights Act: Black Political Mobilization and White Counter-Mobilization”

Federico Masera, University of New South Wales, Michele Rosenberg, University Essex, and Sarah Walker, University of New South Wales, “The Power of Narratives: Anti-Black Attitudes and Violence in the US South”

SESSION 18: SELECTION AND MIGRATION

David Escamilla-Guerrero, University of St Andrews, Miko Lepistö, University of Helsinki, and Chris Minns, London School of Economics, “Explaining Gender Differences in the Selection and Sorting of Migrants: Evidence from Canada-US Migration”

Davide Coluccia, Bocconi University and Gaia Doss, London School of Economics, “Return Innovation: Evidence from the English Migration to the United States, 1850–1940”

Yannay Spitzer, Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Ariell Zimran, Vanderbilt University, “Like an Ink Blot on Paper: Testing the Diffusion Hypothesis of Mass Migration, Italy 1876–1920”

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