Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-jb2ch Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-23T03:45:07.724Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

South Asia, the World System, and World Capitalism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2011

Get access

Extract

The challenge of Immanuel Wallerstein—to reconceive the history of South Asia since 1750 as part of the development of a capitalist world system—has yet to elicit an adequate response from South Asia's historians. While a few social scientists interested in the past have sought to apply his model, the majority of historians have either gone no further than to acknowledge the importance of bilateral relations with imperial Britain in the construction of modern South Asian society, or else—it would seem increasingly—have retreated behind the walls of the “indigenous,” the “local,” the “particular,” and, at times, the just plain “peculiar” in their interpretations of South Asia's modern experience. But few historians of imperial Britain see it as a completely freestanding and self-determining entity, able to direct its relationships with India or elsewhere in a manner unconstrained by developments in other areas of the world. And on closer examination, many of the most quintessentially South Asian institutions and structures, including a large number of those that twentieth century modernization theorists please to call “traditional,” can be seen to have been shaped by global forces.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Association for Asian Studies, Inc. 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

List of References

Alam, Muzaffar. 1986. The Crisis of Empire in Mughal North India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Arnold, David. 1977. The Congress in Tamilnad. Canberra and New Delhi: Manohar.Google Scholar
Baker, Christopher. 1984. An Indian Rural Economy 1880-1955: the Tamilnad Countryside. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Banerjee, Sumanta. 1984. India's Simmering Revolution. London: Zed Press.Google Scholar
Bayly, C. A. 1983. Rulers, Townsmen and Bazaars. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Bardhan, Pranab.1984. The Political Economy of Development in India. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Bharadwaj, K. 1974. Production Conditions in Indian Agriculture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Bianco, Lucien. 1986. “Peasant Movements” in Fairbank, J. and Feuerwerker, A. (eds). Cambridge History of China XIII 2: 270328.Google Scholar
Bose, Sugata. 1986. Agrarian Bengal. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Breman, Jan. 1985. Of Peasants, Migrants and Paupers. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Brenner, Robert. 1977. “The Origins of Capitalist Development.” New Left Review 104: 593.Google Scholar
Chandavarkar, Rajnarayan: 1985, “Industrialization in India before 1947: Conventional Approaches and Alternative Hypotheses.” Modern Asian Studies XIX: 623–68.Google Scholar
Chaudhuri, K. N. 1985. Trade and Civilization in the Indian Ocean. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Chaudhuri, Pramit. 1978. The Indian Economy-Poverty and Development. London: St. Martin's Press.Google Scholar
Cunningham, Hugh. 1981. “The Language of Patriotism.” History Workshop Journal XII: 833.Google Scholar
Cunningham, Hugh. 1986. “Patriotism and the Conservative Party.” In Englishness, ed. Colls, R., 283307. London: Croom Helm.Google Scholar
Dirks, Nicholas. 1987. “Castes of Mind,” unpublished seminar paper.Google Scholar
Dirks, Nicholas. 1987. The Hollow Crown. Cambridge: Cambridge Univeristy Press.Google Scholar
Dumont, Louis. 1970. Homo Hierarchies. London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson.Google Scholar
Fox, Richard. 1970. “The Avatars of Indian Research,” Comparative Studies in Society and History XII: 5770.Google Scholar
Fox, Richard. 1986. Lions of the Punjab. Berkeley: California University Press.Google Scholar
Franda, Marcus. 1971. Radical Politics in West Bengal. Cambridge, Mass. M.I.T. Press.Google Scholar
Giddens, Anthony. 1977. Studies in Social and Political Theory. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Giddens, Anthony. 1985. A Contemporary Critique of Historical Materialism. Volume 2. The Nation-State and Violence. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
Gordon, Leonard. 1976. Bengal: The Nationalist Movement. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Goswami, Omkar. 1985. “Then Came the Marwaris,” Indian Economic and Social History Review XXII: 225–49.Google Scholar
Guha, Ranajit. 1983. Elementary Aspects of Peasant Insurgency in Colonial India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hardiman, David. 1982. Peasant Nationalism in Gujarat. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Harriss, John. 1983. Capitalism and Peasant Farming in South India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hawthorn, Geoffrey. 1976. Enlightenment and Despair. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hiro, Dilip. 1978. Inside India To-day. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Hobsbawm, Eric. 1987. The Age of Empire. London: Weidenfeld and Nicholson.Google Scholar
Inden, Ronald. 1986. “Orientalist Constructions of India,” Modern Asian Studies XX: 401–46.Google Scholar
Inden, Ronald and Marriott, McKim. 1974. “Caste Systems” in Encyclopaedia Britannica. 15th Edition. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica 3: 982–91.Google Scholar
Inden, Ronald and Nicholas, Ralph. 1977. Kinship in Bengali Culture. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Irschick, Eugene. 1969. Politics and Social Conflict in South India. Berkeley: California University Press.Google Scholar
Kling, Blair. 1975. “Economic Foundations of the Bengal Renaissance.” In Aspects of Bengali History and Society, ed. van, R.Baume, M., 2642. Honolulu: Hawaii University Press.Google Scholar
Lenin, V. I. 1969. British Labour and British Imperialism. London: Lawrence and Wishart.Google Scholar
McLane, John. 1976. Indian Nationalism and the Early Congress. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Musgrave, Peter. 1979. “Social Power and Social Change in the United Provinces, 1860-1920.” In Economy and Society, eds., Chaudhuri, K. N. and Dewey, C., 3-26. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Nehru, Jawaharlal. 1946. The Discovery of India. London: Meridian Books.Google Scholar
O'hanlon, Rosalind. 1985. Caste, Conflict and Ideology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Page, David. 1982. Prelude to Partition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Pandey, Gyanendra. 1979. The Ascendancy of the Indian National Congress in Uttar Pradesh. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Pelling, Henry. 1979. Popular Politics and Society in Victorian Britain. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Perlin, Frank. 1978. “Of White Whales and Countrymen in the Eighteenth-Century Maratha Deccan.” Journal of Peasant Studies V: 172237.Google Scholar
Perlin, Frank. 1981. “The Pre-Colonial State in History and Epistemology.” In The Study of the State, eds. H, Claessen and P, Skalnik, 275302. The Hague: Mouton.Google Scholar
Perlin, Frank. 1983. “Proto-Industrialization and Pre-Colonial South Asia.” Past and Present 98: 3095.Google Scholar
Perlin, Frank. 1985. “State Formation Re-Considered.” Modern Asian Studies XIX: 415–80.Google Scholar
Poulantzas, Nicos. 1973. Political Power and Social Classes. London: Sheed and Ward.Google Scholar
Poulantzas, Nicos. 1974. Fascism and Dictatorship. London: New Left Books.Google Scholar
Robinson, Ronald and Gallagher, John. 1953. “The Imperialism of Free Trade.” Economic History Review (2nd series) VI: 115.Google Scholar
Robb, Peter. “Bihar, the Colonial State and Agricultural Development.” Indian Economic and Social History Review XXV, 1988: 205–30.Google Scholar
Said, Edward. 1978. Orientalism. New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Sarkar, Sumit. 1982. Modern India 1885-1947. New Delhi: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Stein, Burton. 1980. Peasant State and Society in Medieval South India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Stein, Burton. 1985. “State Formation and Economy Re-Considered.” Modern Asian Studies XIX: 387414.Google Scholar
Stokes, Eric. 1978. The Peasant and the Raj. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Tinker, Hugh. 1974. A New Kind of Slavery. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Thompson, E. P. 1975. Whigs and Hunters. London: Allen Lane.Google Scholar
Tomlinson, B. R. 1979. The Political Economy of the Raj. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Wallerstein, Immanuel. 1979. The Capitalist World-Economy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Wallerstein, Immanuel. 1983. Historical Capitalism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Wallerstein, Immanuel. 1984. The Politics of the World-Economy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Wallerstein, Immanuel. 1985. “The Incorporation of the Indian Sub-Continent into the Capitalist World-Economy,” paper read at Seminar on The Indian Ocean, New Delhi.Google Scholar
Washbrook, David. 1981. “Law, State and Agrarian Society in Colonial India,” Modern Asian Studies XV: 649722.Google Scholar
Washbrook, David. 1988. “Progress and Problems: South Asian Social and Economic History, c. 1720-1860.” Modern Asian Studies XXII: 5796.Google Scholar
Washbrook, David. 1989. “Caste, Class and Dominance In Modern Tamilnadu.” In State Power and Social Dominance In Modern India. Eds. Frankel, F. and Rao, M. S. A.. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Wink, Andre. 1984. “Sovereignty and Universal Dominion in South Asia.” Indian Economic and Social History Review XXI: 265–92.Google Scholar