Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-prt4h Total loading time: 0.147 Render date: 2021-10-17T04:41:36.231Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Religious and Social Change in Southern Laos

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2011

Charles F. Keyes
Affiliation:
University of Washington

Abstract

The New Year Ceremony at Basak (South Laos) by Charles Archaimbault, which is the subject of this review article, provides a superb illustration of the way in which ritual and mythical symbols express historical alterations in social structure and social experience. While there has been continuity in the symbols of the New Year ceremony, the ritual context which invests these symbols with meaning has changed. This change reflects the diminution of the power of the putative ruler of Campasak who plays the crucial role in the ceremony.

Type
Review Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Association for Asian Studies, Inc. 1972

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 Also compare Archaimbault's, M.L'histoire de Campasak,” Journal Asiatique, CCXLIX, 4 (1961), pp. 519595Google Scholar.

2 cf. Bunnag, Tej, The Provincial Administration of Siam from 1892 to 1915 (D.Phil, thesis, Oxford University, 1968)Google Scholar and Vickery, Michael, “Thai Regional Elites and the Reforms of King Chulalongkorn,” Journal of Asian Studies, XXIX, 4 (1970), pp. 863882CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

3 See Bunnag, Tej, “Khabot phu mi bun phakisan R.S. 121,” [“Merit-possessing Persons Revolt in Northeast Thailand, 1902”], Sangkhomsat Pori-that lsqb;‘Social Science Review’[ (Bangkok), V (1967), pp. 7886Google Scholar.

4 In a forthcoming paper on millenarian movements in Thailand I will discuss the implications of Lao millenarianism more fully.

5 The concept of “dominant symbol” is here borrowed from Victor Turner, The Forest of Symbols (Ithaca, N. Y.: Cornell University Press, 1967), p. 20et passim.Google Scholar

1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Religious and Social Change in Southern Laos
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Religious and Social Change in Southern Laos
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Religious and Social Change in Southern Laos
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *