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Conjugality and Capital: Gender, Families, and Property under Colonial Law in India

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 March 2007

Mytheli Sreenivas
Affiliation:
mytheli.sreenivas@uconn.eduAssistant Professor of History at theUniversity of Connecticut.
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Abstract

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Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Association for Asian Studies 2004

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References

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