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The Limits of Sasanian History: Between Iranian, Islamic and Late Antique Studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2022

Touraj Daryaee*
Affiliation:
University of California, Irvine

Abstract

This essay discusses the position of Sasanian Studies from its inception in the late nineteenth century, to its reinvigoration at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The work also discusses the development of the field of Sasanian history and civilization vis-à-vis the three fields of Iranian, Islamic and Late Antique Studies. It is posited that Sasanians have benefited from cross-disciplinary and new historical frameworks that go beyond the traditional field of Iranian Studies, which was never as interested in the history of the period.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The International Society for Iranian Studies 2016

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Footnotes

This paper was delivered at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London in the spring of 2014.

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