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Bacterial and Fungal Counts in Hospital Air: Comparative Yields for 4 Sieve Impactor Air Samplers With 2 Culture Media

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2016

Jean-Pierre Gangneux
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Parasitologie-Mycologie et Unité d'Hygiène hospitalière, Centre Hospitaller Universitaire Pontchaillou, Rennes, France
Florence Robert-Gangneux
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Biologie et Unité d'Hygiène Hospitalière, Hôpital Broussais, Saint-Malo, France
Guirec Gicquel
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Parasitologie-Mycologie et Unité d'Hygiène hospitalière, Centre Hospitaller Universitaire Pontchaillou, Rennes, France
Jean-Jacques Tanquerel
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Biologie et Unité d'Hygiène Hospitalière, Hôpital Broussais, Saint-Malo, France
Sylviane Chevrier
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Parasitologie-Mycologie et Unité d'Hygiène hospitalière, Centre Hospitaller Universitaire Pontchaillou, Rennes, France
Magali Poisson
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Parasitologie-Mycologie et Unité d'Hygiène hospitalière, Centre Hospitaller Universitaire Pontchaillou, Rennes, France
Martine Aupée
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Parasitologie-Mycologie et Unité d'Hygiène hospitalière, Centre Hospitaller Universitaire Pontchaillou, Rennes, France
Claude Guiguen
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Parasitologie-Mycologie et Unité d'Hygiène hospitalière, Centre Hospitaller Universitaire Pontchaillou, Rennes, France
Corresponding

Abstract

We compared the yields of 4 recently developed sieve impactor air samplers that meet international standard ISO 14698-1, using 2 growth media (tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar) in real conditions of use. Several hospital sites expected to have different densities of airborne microflora were selected in 2 hospitals. The Samplair MK2, Air Ideal, and Mas-100 samplers yielded higher bacterial counts than did the SAS Super-100 device (P<.05). No significant differences in fungal counts were noted between the 4 devices. The use of malt extract agar in addition to tryptic soy agar significantly improved the fungal yield.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2006

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References

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