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How To Think Globally: Stretching the Limits of Imagination

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2020

Abstract

Here I discuss some epistemological questions posed by projects of attempting to think globally, in light of the impossibility of affirming universal sameness. I illustrate one strategy for embarking on such a project, ecologically, in a reading of an essay by Chandra Talpade Mohanty. And I conclude by suggesting that the North/South border between Canada and the U.S.A. generates underacknowledged issues of cultural alterity.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Hypatia, Inc.

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