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Stereotypes of incompetence in schizophrenia among mental health professionals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2022

K.-M. Valery*
Affiliation:
University of Bordeaux, Psychology, Bordeaux, France
A. Prouteau
Affiliation:
University of Bordeaux, Psychology, Bordeaux, France
T. Fournier
Affiliation:
University of Bordeaux, Psychology, Bordeaux, France
L. Violeau
Affiliation:
University of Bordeaux, Psychology, Bordeaux, France
S. Guionnet
Affiliation:
University of Bordeaux, Psychology, Bordeaux, France
*
*Corresponding author.

Abstract

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Introduction

Mental health professionals are one of the major sources of stigma for persons with schizophrenia and their families. The stereotype of incompetence is central in this stigmatization, whereas valuing skills is a fundamental aspect of mental health care and recovery.

Objectives

The aim of this study is to identify the domains of competence stigmatized in schizophrenia by mental health professionals and the factors associated with this stigmatization.

Methods

An online survey was conducted with a specific measure of the stereotype of incompetence and these associated factors. Participants were to be mental health professionals who work or have worked with persons with schizophrenia. These participants were recruited through professional social networks.

Results

Responses of 164 participants were analyzed. The results reported four highly stigmatized skill domains: ability to relate well socially, ability to be effective in their work, ability to make decisions about their health, and ability to control their emotions. Intelligence was found to be less stigmatized than the other dimensions. Recovery beliefs, categorical beliefs, and perceived similarities were factors associated with the stereotype of incompetence.

Conclusions

Responses of 164 participants were analyzed. The results reported four highly stigmatized skill domains: ability to relate well socially, ability to be effective in their work, ability to make decisions about their health, and ability to control their emotions. Intelligence was found to be less stigmatized than the other dimensions. Recovery beliefs, categorical beliefs, and perceived similarities were factors associated with the stereotype of incompetence.

Disclosure

No significant relationships.

Type
Abstract
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the European Psychiatric Association
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