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The role of Vit D and parathyroid hormone in clinical severity of patients with bipolar disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2021

C. Palummo*
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
L. Marone
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
V. Caivano
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
A. Vece
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
L. Steardo
Affiliation:
Health Sciences, University Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy
M. Luciano
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
A. Di Cerbo
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
V. Del Vecchio
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
A. Fiorillo
Affiliation:
Department Of Psychiatry, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy
*
*Corresponding author.

Abstract

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Introduction

Vitamin D modulates the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors, thus influencing mood and its alterations. Decreased blood levels of Vitamin D are involved in many psychiatric disorders, in particular, affective disorders. As regards bipolar disorder (BD), an association between vitamin D deficiency and severity of illness has been found.

Objectives

In this observational study, we assessed calcium homeostasis imbalance in a sample of patients with BD; in particular, we explored whether serum levels of PTH, Vitamin D and calcium influence the clinical presentation of BD and its symptom severity.

Methods

All patients were administered with validated assessment instruments to assess psychopathology, affective temperaments and global functioning. Vitamin D and PTH levels were assessed in all patients. An-ad hoc schedule was administered for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics.

Results

The total sample consisted of 199 patients (females: 51%; mean age: 47.1 ± 13.2 years). Levels of serum PTH were directly correlated with the total number of hospitalizations (p< 0.01), and of depressive (p< 0.0001), manic (p< 0.001) and hypomanic episodes (p< 0.01). Serum levels of Vitamin D were positively associated with age at first psychiatric contact and were inversely correlated with the total number of depressive episodes (p< 0.05) and cyclothymic temperament (p< 0.05).

Conclusions

Increased levels of PTH and Vit D correlate with a worse clinical outcome of patients with BD. Our results highlight the importance to routinely assess PTH, Vit D and calcium levels in BD patients. Moreover, vitamin D may represent a valid add-on treatment for these patients.

Disclosure

No significant relationships.

Type
Abstract
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the European Psychiatric Association
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