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PW01-206 - People'S Perception Of Their Involuntary Admission At One Year Follow-Up And Readmission Rates To Hospital

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2020

B. O’Donoghue
Affiliation:
DETECT - Early Intervention for Psychosis, Dublin, Ireland
J. Lyne
Affiliation:
DETECT - Early Intervention for Psychosis, Dublin, Ireland
M. Hill
Affiliation:
Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Services, Dublin, Ireland
L. O’Rourke
Affiliation:
St John of God Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
S. Daly
Affiliation:
Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Services, Dublin, Ireland
C. Larkin
Affiliation:
St John of God Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
L. Feeney
Affiliation:
Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Services, Dublin, Ireland
E. O’Callaghan
Affiliation:
DETECT - Early Intervention for Psychosis, Dublin, Ireland

Abstract

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Background

There is limited knowledge of how individuals reflect on their involuntary admission.

Objectives

To investigate, at one year after an involuntary admission,

  1. (i) peoples perception of the necessity of their involuntary admission

  2. (ii) the enduring impact on the relationship with their family, consultant psychiatrist and employment prospects

  3. (iii) readmission rates to hospital and risk factors for readmission.

Methods

People that were admitted involuntarily over a 15 month period were re-interviewed at one year following discharge.

Results

Sixty eight people were re-interviewed at one year and this resulted in a follow-up rate of 84%. Prior to discharge, 72% of people reported that their involuntary admission had been necessary however this reduced to 60% after one year. Over one third of people changed their views and the majority of these patients reflected negatively towards their involuntary admission.

One quarter of people continued to experience a negative impact on the relationship with a family member and their consultant psychiatrist one year after an involuntary admission, while 13% reported a positive impact. A similar proportion perceived that it had negative consequences in their employment.

Within one year, 43% of all patients involuntarily admitted in the study period were readmitted to hospital and half of these admissions were involuntary. Involuntary readmission was associated with a sealing over recovery style.

Conclusions

Peoples’ perception of the necessity of their involuntary admissions changes significantly over time. Involuntary admissions can have a lasting negative impact on the relationship with family members and treating consultant psychiatrist.

Type
Social psychiatry
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2009
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