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P-1375 - Longitudinal Assessment of Ect-induced Brain Structure Changeslongitudinal Assessment of Ect-induced Brain Structure Changes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020

W. Zhao
Affiliation:
Mental Health Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing
H. Meng
Affiliation:
Mental Health Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing
X. Du
Affiliation:
Suzhou Guangji Hospital, Suzhou
F. Wu
Affiliation:
Mental Health Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing
H. Hu
Affiliation:
Mental Health Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing
W. Deng
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing
P. Xie
Affiliation:
Mental Health Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing Mental Health Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu
Q. Luo
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China

Abstract

Introduction

Many MRI studies have cited major depression, with or without anti-depressive treatment, associated with structural plasticity changing in several brain regions. Few of these studies researched the effect of the anti-depressive treatment, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), on depression.

Objective

To assess the influence of ECT on the brain structure change during the treatment process by utilizing the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis.

Aims

To determine whether ECT alter brain structure.

Methods

We performed HAMD ratings and MRI scans on 12 depressive patients during ECT, analyzing the data by VBM with SPM8 software's family-wise error correction (FWE).

Results

The researchers found volumes changes in white matter in 37 regions between pre-ECT and post-ECT1, but only one region changing between pre-ECT and post-ECT8. Seven regions changing in grey matter between pre-ECT and post-ECT 1⌧but none regions changing between pre-ECT and post-ECT8.

Conclusions

The density changes in several brain regions after a single ECT stimuli, but return to the original level after completing the eighth ECT. Our finding supports that ECT may play a temporary role in treating major depression but do not permanently alter the structures of brain.

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2012
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P-1375 - Longitudinal Assessment of Ect-induced Brain Structure Changeslongitudinal Assessment of Ect-induced Brain Structure Changes
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