Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-7l5rh Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-27T12:54:41.362Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

P03-343 - Treatment Choice in Psychiatry? How Would European Trainees Treat Psychosis for Their Patients and Themselves, and what Influences Decision-Making?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2020

S. Jauhar
Affiliation:
Dept of Psychiatry, Hairmyres Hospital, Glasgow, UK
S. Guloksuz
Affiliation:
Psychiatry Dept., Bakirkoy Research and Training Hospital for Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery, Istanbul, Turkey
J. Gama Marques
Affiliation:
Dept of Psychiatry, Lisbon, Portugal
M. Bendix
Affiliation:
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
G. Lydall
Affiliation:
University College London, London, UK
O. Andlauer
Affiliation:
Université de Franche- Comté, Besançon, France
S. Gerber
Affiliation:
Dept of Psychiatry, Freiburg, Germany
C. Roventa
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Bucharest, Romania
J. Van Zanten
Affiliation:
Dept. of Psychiatry, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
N. De Vriendt
Affiliation:
Brugmann University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Brussel, Belgium
A. Nawka
Affiliation:
Prague Psychiatric Centre and 3rd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
I. Nwachukw
Affiliation:
University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
E. Dobrzynska
Affiliation:
Cygnet Hospital, Bristol, UK
A. Mufic
Affiliation:
Dept Psychiatry, Zagreb, Croatia
A. Nazaraliev
Affiliation:
Moscow University, Moscow, Russia
I. Dumitrescu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Bucharest, Romania
L. Mendonca
Affiliation:
Dept of Psychiatry, Lisbon, Portugal
F. Riese
Affiliation:
Zurich University Psychiatric Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract

Core share and HTML view are not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Objectives

Recent evidence has questioned modern psychiatric clinical practice, specifically the prescribing of “atypical” antipsychotics. Our Pan-European Research Group wished to ascertain clinical practice amongst European trainees, which treatments trainees would desire for themselves, and factors influencing this.

Methods

A semi-structured survey was constructed from prior literature, piloted, and a homogenous sample size of at least 50 was agreed upon from each country, with 50% minimum response rate. It was distributed via web-link, with questions on preference of antipsychotic for patients in given scenarios, and factors influencing choice. Physicians were asked for their preference should they develop psychosis.

Results

  1. i) Treatment choice of antipsychotic for patients

93% (n=600) of respondents chose to prescribe “atypical” antipsychotics (excluding Clozapine), 6% (n=42) choosing “typical” antipsychotics, 1% (n=6) choosing Clozapine as first-line therapy.

  1. ii) Treatment choice if trainees developed psychosis

89% (n=530) of responders chose to prescribe “atypical” antipsychotics (excluding Clozapine), 7% (n=40) choosing “typical” antipsychotics, 4% (n=23) choosing Clozapine as first-line therapy.

  1. iii) Factors influencing choice

These mapped onto three domains: cost, efficacy and side-effect profile (less than 5% other reasons). 79% (n=458) of those who responded felt efficacy most important, 46% (n=270) felt side-effect profile most important and 3% (n=16) considered cost of paramount importance.

38% (n=272) of those who responded to the survey stated that the CATIE trial had influenced their decision-making.

Conclusions

Psychiatry trainees’ choice of antipsychotic medication for both patients and themselves is based on perceived benefits, as opposed to evidence base and recent literature.

Type
Psychopharmacological treatment and biological therapies
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2010
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.