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Insomnia at the onset of addiction treatment may be related to earlier relapses: A one-year follow-up study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2021

R. Palma Álvarez*
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
C. Daigre
Affiliation:
Psychiatry, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
E. Ros-Cucurull
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
P. Serrano-Pérez
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
G. Ortega-Hernandez
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
C. Fadeuilhe
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
M. Sorribes
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
A. Pereira
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
J.A. Ramos-Quiroga
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
C. Roncero
Affiliation:
Psychiatry, Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca. Instituto de Biomedicina de Salamanca., Salamanca, Spain
L. Grau-López
Affiliation:
Secció D’adiccions I Patologia Dual, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain
*
*Corresponding author.

Abstract

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Introduction

Insomnia has been related to a more severe substance use disorder presentation (1). There are few longitudinal studies in outpatients center for SUD treatment that evaluate how insomnia impacts on relapses.

Objectives

To analyze how insomnia impacts on the time of the first substance relapse in SUD outpatients after the onset of addiction treatment.

Methods

This is a one-year follow-up study performed on 116 patients (73.3% males; mean age 43.4±14.3) for whom we had information from baseline insomnia and the time for the first relapse. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. This is part of a greater research on Alexithymia in SUD in a longitudinal study.

Results

The initial sample consisted of 116 patients, information on relapses was available for 113 patients. The main substances used at baseline were alcohol (62.1%), cocaine (56.0%), cannabis (42.2%), and opiates (30.2%).

Conclusions

It is important to evaluate insomnia at the onset of addiction treatment because insomnia may be related to earlier relapses. Furthermore, it should be analyzed further on how insomnia treatment impact on substance relapses. REFERENCES 1. Miller MB, Donahue ML, Carey KB, Scott-Sheldon LAJ. Insomnia treatment in the context of alcohol use disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2017;181:200-207. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.09.029

Type
Abstract
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the European Psychiatric Association
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